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Spain vs. Portugal.
Topic Started: Oct 16 2010, 08:58 PM (1,874 Views)
Delilah
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count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 11:14 PM
I think the P.R.s owe their existence to the american engineers that drained the swamps and the doctors that eliminated malaria and syphillis from wiping out the entire population.
What you think is irrevelant. The Americans exploited Puerto Rico. They may have given but they also took back. It's not like they helped Puerto Rico out of the kindness of their hearts. Puerto Rico never asked to be part of the USA back in 1898. In fact, just six months prior to being seized by the USA the Spanish had allowed them to self-govern.
Edited by Delilah, Oct 16 2010, 11:20 PM.
"Let nothing disturb you. Let nothing frighten you. All things pass. God does not change. Patience achieves everything. Whoever has God lacks nothing. God alone suffices." St. Teresa of Avila
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Suevo
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count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 10:41 PM
You neglect the huge number of gypsies and the flamenco culture , flamenco is of north african and mid east origin. Do you read much?
Are you retarded ? Flamenco is not even spanish culture, it's gypsy culture from Andalusia, and it's a minoritary culture, nobody listens to flamenco in Spain, only gypsies and tourists. And before the 20th century not even spaniards knew about flamenco, only a marginal reduced group pf gypsyes in Andalusia. Stop with this Hollywood stereotypical bullshit, it's not the real Spain, only propaganda for tourists
Edited by Suevo, Oct 16 2010, 11:19 PM.
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count markovalley
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not spanish culture ;just culture from andalusia . O.K. and in what country do you find andalasia ? do you own a map?

can you use one?
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Delilah
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Who MarkoftheValley really is..... Drum role please.

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He's Mr. Heatmiser! He's Mister Hot!
Edited by Delilah, Oct 16 2010, 11:28 PM.
"Let nothing disturb you. Let nothing frighten you. All things pass. God does not change. Patience achieves everything. Whoever has God lacks nothing. God alone suffices." St. Teresa of Avila
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count markovalley
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Delilah
Oct 16 2010, 11:18 PM
count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 11:14 PM
I think the P.R.s owe their existence to the american engineers that drained the swamps and the doctors that eliminated malaria and syphillis from wiping out the entire population.
What you think is irrevelant. The Americans exploited Puerto Rico. They may have given but they also took back. It's not like they helped Puerto Rico out of the kindness of their hearts. Puerto Rico never asked to be part of the USA back in 1898. In fact, just six months prior to being seized by the USA the Spanish had allowed them to self-govern.
But what have the P.R.s contributed to the american nation ,other than syphillis , a depraved lifestyle and a big appetite for food stamps?

If I had to draw a list of useless eaters the P.R.s and the majority of african americans would be on the top of the list. At least the mexicans know how to sing . and they also do good pavement work.
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PortuguesePoster
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Delilah
Oct 16 2010, 11:27 PM
Who MarkoftheValley really is..... Drum role please.

Posted Image

He's Mr. Heatmiser! He's Mister Hot!
Posted Image
"Meds aren't really dusky wogs, they're just whites with more sunshine in 'em! :P "
faintsmile1992

"Nobody is too white for salsa music"
Gotlander
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count markovalley
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No really ,I'm just trying to fight the marxists that have taken over the usa . If I have to fight the P.R.s then so be it.

One word I have never learned the meaning of is the word surrender; the word has never been part of my vocabulary.
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PortuguesePoster
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count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 11:33 PM
No really ,I'm just trying to fight the marxists that have taken over the usa . If I have to fight the P.R.s then so be it.

One word I have never learned the meaning of is the word surrender; the word has never been part of my vocabulary.
Can anyone say, Delusions of grandeur?

How do you go about fighting the marxists who have taken over the USA?

I know, by trolling an anthroforum on a saturday night!
"Meds aren't really dusky wogs, they're just whites with more sunshine in 'em! :P "
faintsmile1992

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Suevo
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count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 11:23 PM
not spanish culture ;just culture from andalusia . O.K. and in what country do you find andalasia ? do you own a map?

can you use one?
how do I have to say it ? It's not spanish nor andalusian culture, It's origin is from gypsies in andalusia and the fact that it is known worlwide as "spanish culture" doesn't mean it's spanish culture, because it has been promoted and forced by politicians since the end of 19th century as "culture of Spain" when in fact before the 20th it was only a marginal unknown culture practiced by gypsyes and nobody in Spain knew about flamenco until the 20th century. By truth is that nobody likes nor listens to flamenco in Spain, so don't know be suprised when you come to Spain, one thing is marketing to attract tourists and another thing is the Reality of a country. Real spanish music and culture is what you find in the folk culture of the different regions of Spain, and Andalusia has Castillian culture, not this imposed and false culture of gypsies, only to make money for tourists in search of something exotic. The image of Spain they sell is false. Thanks
Edited by Suevo, Oct 16 2010, 11:53 PM.
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Delilah
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Suevo
Oct 16 2010, 11:52 PM
count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 11:23 PM
not spanish culture ;just culture from andalusia . O.K. and in what country do you find andalasia ? do you own a map?

can you use one?
how do I have to say it ? It's not spanish nor andalusian culture, It's origin is from gypsies in andalusia and the fact that it is known worlwide as "spanish culture" doesn't mean it's spanish culture, because it has been promoted and forced by politicians since the end of 19th century as "culture of Spain" when in fact before the 20th it was only a marginal unknown culture practiced by gypsyes and nobody in Spain knew about flamenco until the 20th century. By truth is that nobody likes nor listens to flamenco in Spain, so don't know be suprised when you come to Spain, one thing is marketing to attract tourists and another thing is the Reality of a country. Real spanish music and culture is what you find in the folk culture of the different regions of Spain, and Andalusia has Castillian culture, not this imposed and false culture of gypsies, only to make money for tourists in search of something exotic. The image of Spain they sell is false. Thanks
That's an interesting take on flamenco. But you must know. So not really popular in Spain? I like it. Maybe I have some gypsy blood from way back, LOL!
"Let nothing disturb you. Let nothing frighten you. All things pass. God does not change. Patience achieves everything. Whoever has God lacks nothing. God alone suffices." St. Teresa of Avila
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Arch Hades
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I like Spain more to be honest, the Spaniards are cool, they have their own swagger about them.

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Drac
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count markovalley
 
Spain is a bridge that connects europe to africa


There is no "bridge" between Spain and Africa, but a gap of water, which it just so happens to have been a pretty effective genetic barrier:

"Had the sea distance been the main isolating factor, we would have expected greater genetic differences in the eastern part of the Mediterranean. Exactly the opposite appears to be the case. The genetic boundary separating northern Morocco and Algeria from southern Spain appears as the zones of sharpest genetic change using Prevosti's distances and as the second most significant zone of change (after the zone separating Israeli Jews from all their neighbors) using Nei's distances.The ranking of the genetic boundaries recognized in this study tends to decrease as one moves east, despite sea distances being greater there. Thus it is the presence of the sea rather than the sea distance between localities that seems to have exerted the main isolating effect." - Simoni et al. (1999) Patterns of Gene Flow Inferred from Genetic Distances in the Mediterranean Region. Hum Biol; 71:399-415


"In figure 3, no significant correlation is apparent between North African admixture and geography. Genetic exchanges across the Mediterranean Sea, and especially in its western-most part where the geographic distance between continents is smallest, seem to have been limited or very limited (Simoni et al. 1999; Bosch et al. 2001)." - Dupanloup et al. (2004) Estimating the Impact of Prehistoric Admixture on the Genome of Europeans. Mol. Biol. Evol. 21(7):1361-1372

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and the fact that the moors and jews lived there for many centuries makes them an anthropological and historical curiosity.


Both "Moors" and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula were nothing but a small demographic minority, less than 5% of the population in the first case, and about 1% in the second case. Plus "Moors" and Jews have also been elsewhere in Europe for centuries, including as far north as the British Isles, for example:

"The Notitia Imperii shows us that bodies of Syrians, Cilicians, Spaniards, Moors, Thracians, Dalmatians, Frisians, &c., formed the military colonists of the stations in Britain; and when even the emperors themselves were often not of Italian birth, and the most trusted officers and governors provincials or even barbarians, we have no reason to suppose that any notable proportion of genuine Roman blood found its way to this country..." - John Beddoe, "The Races of Britain", page 31.

"We find Thracians at Maglona (Machynlleth) and Moors at Aballaba (Appleby); elsewhere Batavians, Dalmatians, Spaniards, and even Syrian and Taifalic cavalry..." - Robert Owen, "The Kymry: their origin, history, and international relations", page 68.

"We know that there was no homogenous body of soldiery in Britain.The legions contained Syrians, Cilicians, Spaniards, Moors, Thracians, Dalmatians, Frisians, etc., and this fact seems to be a clear proof of the growing paucity of Roman citizens in Italy and the provinces." - Charles McLean Andrews, "The old English manor: a study in English economic history", page 35.

So there is no "anthropological curiosity" in this either.
count markovalley
Oct 16 2010, 10:41 PM
You neglect the huge number of gypsies and the flamenco culture , flamenco is of north african and mid east origin. Do you read much?
Flamenco is only about 200 years old:

http://www.flamenco-world.com/what/what.htm

Is not "of north african and mid east origin", and is "typical" only in the deep south of Spain, but it does indeed have Gypsy influence.
Edited by Drac, Oct 17 2010, 07:37 AM.
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PortuguesePoster
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Don´t get so worked up over what this "count" mexivagrant says. He´s obviously a troll, probably from Israel, who just says things designed to get individual posters angry.
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faintsmile1992

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The troll has been banned.
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Racial Reality Site | Racial Reality Blog | Italianthro Blog
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Delilah
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Oct 17 2010, 02:15 PM
The troll has been banned.
Yay! And not a moment too soon!
"Let nothing disturb you. Let nothing frighten you. All things pass. God does not change. Patience achieves everything. Whoever has God lacks nothing. God alone suffices." St. Teresa of Avila
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PortuguesePoster
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Delilah
Oct 17 2010, 05:47 PM
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Oct 17 2010, 02:15 PM
The troll has been banned.
Yay! And not a moment too soon!
Good riddance!
"Meds aren't really dusky wogs, they're just whites with more sunshine in 'em! :P "
faintsmile1992

"Nobody is too white for salsa music"
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I have to agree with portuguese poster that most spaniards see portugal as a forgotten spanish region, and don't pay mutch attention to them , and that would annoy me if I were a Portu (which I find extremely sad, since Portugal is as fascinating a Iberian region as Basquelandia, Catalogna, Flamencusia , Gaul-icia, or the Swarthy Canarians) The whole peninsula should be much more open and less stereotyping towards each other.
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ARES LVSITANO
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Lepanto, the Battle of
Contributed by Prof. Dr. Nazeer Ahmed, PhD

In the last third of the 16th century, three critical events had a decisive impact on the course of Islamic history. One was the Battle of Lepanto (1571) fought off the coast of Greece in which the combined navies of the Vatican, Venice and Spain managed to stop the Ottoman navy, slowing the Ottoman advance to the west and denying them access to the Atlantic Ocean and the Americas. The second was the Battle of al Qasr al Kabir (1578) in which the Moroccan army crushed Portuguese invaders in North Africa, shattering Christian ambitions to conquer and colonize the Maghrib. The third was the Moroccan invasion of the Songhay Empire (1592), which destroyed Timbaktu and other major trade centers along the Niger River, contributed to the political disintegration of West Africa, and facilitated increased slave trade to America.

The key to understanding these events lies, once again, in the social and political disintegration of Muslim North Africa after the dissolution of the Al Muhaddith Empire. Muslim Spain was not the only object of Christian Iberian Crusades. Sensing a political vacuum in the Maghrib, and taking advantage of the mutual warfare among the local emirs of Morocco (the Merinides), Algeria (the Zayyanids), and Tunisia (the Hafsids), both Portugal and Castile moved to occupy important strategic posts along the coast of Africa. In this effort, they were helped by the naval power of Venice and Genoa. Not that the Christians were contemplating a conquest of the Maghrib at this time. As yet, they did not possess the superiority in organization and arms necessary for an outright conquest. Moreover, there were internal rivalries among the Christians themselves, in particular between Portugal and Castile, precluding a sustained onslaught on North Africa.

In 1355, Tripoli was attacked and briefly occupied by Genoa. In 1390, a combined French and Genoese force invaded the ancient city of Mahdiya. In 1399, Castile occupied Tetuan in Morocco. In 1415, the strategic harbor of Ceuta on the Straits of Gibraltar fell to the Portuguese who continued their advance along the Atlantic coast occupying the strategic port of Al Qasr al Kabir in 1458. By 1470, Tangiers was under Portuguese control. Trade routes between North Africa and southern Europe were now firmly in Christian hands.

The union of Castile and Aragon under Ferdinand and Isabella, and the conquest of Granada (1492), removed the last hurdle in the way of Spanish expansion. Flush from their victory, and expulsion of the Jews (1492) and Muslims (1502) alike, the Spaniards expanded their possessions in the Mediterranean. The discovery of America (1492), and the subsequent loot from the Aztec, Mayan and Inca empires, made Spain a world power. The Popes acted as powerbrokers in medieval Europe, and they brought about a reconciliation between Spain and Portugal. In 1494, Pope Alexander VI drew an arbitrary line around the globe, dividing up the world between Spain and Portugal, for each to conquer and bring under the fold of Christianity.

The military machine of the Iberian Christians had been perfected during their protracted struggle with the Muslims. Now it was let loose on the rest of the world. There followed a general thrust of the western Crusades aimed at the total conquest of the Maghrib. In 1505, Mars al Kabir (Algeria) fell to the Spanish. Oran (Algeria) fell in 1509. Bogie (Tunisia) was captured in 1510. Tripoli (Libya) was destroyed in 1511. Tlemcen became a Spanish protectorate in 1512. Meanwhile, the Portuguese moved along the western coast of Morocco. Agadir was occupied in 1505. Converted into a strong fortress named Santa Cruz, it became a powerful base for further expansion. In 1507, Safi was occupied. In 1513, Azemour fell. By 1515, the Portuguese controlled the entire coastline of West Africa, from Morocco to the Horn. The bases along this coast served as an anchor point for their further expansion around the coast of Africa and into the Indian Ocean. They also served as shipping centers for the Atlantic slave trade, which now began to gather momentum.

The global tide of Portuguese and Spanish expansion took place precisely at a time when the Islamic world was in convulsion. This was the period during which the great dynasties of the Safavids (1501) and the Moghuls (1526) were founded and the Ottomans were consolidating their power. The Battle of Chaldiran between the Safavids and the Ottomans was fought in 1514, and 1517 was the year when the Ottomans captured Egypt from the Mamlukes. It was not until 1526 that the Ottomans, the Safavids and the Moghuls finally settled down and started the process of global resistance to Portuguese and Spanish aggression.

By 1530 the Spaniards had conquered most of the trading outposts on the Mediterranean coast of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. Tripoli (Libya) and Malta fell to the Spaniards who handed them over to the Knights of St. John to garrison and hold. The Spanish were not alone in their thrust into Muslim territories. Venice, Genoa and the Vatican were equally active. At stake were not only the trade routes of the Mediterranean but also the very soul of North Africa. In 1532, the Genoese captured Coron in the Adriatic. Sulaiman the Magnificent (1520-1565), the Ottoman Sultan, could not disregard this challenge. As the Caliph, he was duty bound to protect Muslims no matter where they lived.

Sulaiman ordered Ibrahim Pasha, grand vizier of the Caliphate, to upgrade the Ottoman fleet. Ibrahim was in Egypt, reorganizing the administration of that province. He was a man of extraordinary abilities whose legacy sustained the Ottoman administrative machinery until the 19th century. The Ottoman navy was already a force to be reckoned with, thanks to the initiatives taken by Sultan Selim I. Ibrahim Pasha proceeded to build on that foundation. Timber for shipbuilding was plentiful in Lebanon. There were first-rate harbors in Turkey, Egypt and Syria. What was needed was leadership and trained manpower for the sea. This he found on the coast of North Africa.

As the Christian powers of Spain, Venice and Genoa monopolized the Mediterranean trade (1500-1530), the North Africans increasingly turned to piracy. Rich bounty was available from Genoese ships in the Mediterranean as well as Spanish ships in the Atlantic carrying the loot from the Americas to Spain. The North Africans-as well as the English-attacked these ships for their booty. The skills and the art of the seas were perfected in the process.

Ibrahim Pasha convinced Sulaiman the Magnificent to invite these captains of the sea to Istanbul and press them into the service of the Caliphate. One of these captains was Khairuddin of Algiers, who was amongst the ablest admirals of the age. Khairuddin was made the admiral of the empire. Within a span of five years, he changed the balance of power in the eastern Mediterranean. In 1534, he recaptured Tunis from the Spanish.

There began an historic struggle between Spain and the Ottomans for control of North Africa. The question was whether the Maghrib would remain Muslim or be ceded, as Spain had been, to the Christians. The shaykhs in Tunisia and the emirs of the old Hafsid dynasty resisted Ottoman rule because it meant a loss of their privileged position. They preferred the Christian Spaniards to the Muslim Turks. With the connivance of the shaykhs and the emirs, the Spanish took Tunis in 1535, reinstalling the old Hafsid ruler, Hassan. In retaliation, Khairuddin raided the coast of Valencia (1536) in Spain. In 1537, he captured the Venetian island of Corfu and Otranto in southern Italy where he established an Ottoman base. Morea and the islands in the Adriatic Sea followed. With the Turks at the doorsteps of Rome, panic set in. Pope Paul III organized a combined armada of the principal Christian sea powers to resist the Ottomans. In 1538, at the Battle of Prevesa, the Turks destroyed this armada, consisting of the navies of Venice and the Vatican. The issue was settled for the time being. For thirty-two years thereafter, from 1538 to 1570, Ottoman power in the eastern Mediterranean was supreme.

The focus now shifted to the western Mediterranean. Charles V, Emperor of Spain struck at Algeria in 1541, wreaking havoc on the coastal cities. In turn, Khairuddin took Otranto in Italy in 1541, forcing Venice to sue for peace. Khairuddin died in 1546, leaving behind a large cadre of trained admirals including the celebrated Piri Rais. Piri Rais was a consummate seaman who combined in his person outstanding organizational abilities with a superb understanding of sea power. A map of the Atlantic produced by Piri Rais in 1561, shows the coasts of West Africa, Europe and Brazil in such detail and such accuracy that it would meet the requirements of modern day cartography.

Tripoli in Libya, and the island of Malta, were keys to the trade routes in the Mediterranean. Since 1530, Spain had occupied Malta and had delegated the task of defending it to the Knights of St. John. These Knights acted as pirates, wreaking havoc on Muslim ships and pilgrims on their way to hajj. In 1551, one of Piri Rais’s admirals, Torgud Rais, reclaimed Tripoli, throwing out the knights of St. John. In Spain, meanwhile, Phillip II had succeeded Charles V. The Spaniards mustered a powerful fleet and moved against the Ottomans. Admiral Piyali Pasha routed and destroyed this fleet at Djerba in 1561. Piri Rais followed up with a siege of Malta in 1565, but the effort was not successful. Sultan Sulaiman the Magnificent passed away the following year (1565). He had made Ottoman power the dominant land power in Europe and almost realized his goal to make the Ottoman navy the dominant navy in the world.

The struggle between the Ottoman Caliphate and the Christian powers of Spain and Portugal had now become global. Moroccan, French and English ships routinely intercepted Spanish ships carrying the loot from the Mayan, Aztec and Inca civilizations of America. In the Mediterranean, the Ottomans faced the combined naval power of Spain, Italy and the Vatican. In the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean, the Ottoman navy took on the Portuguese. Battles were fought as far west as Algiers(Algeria) and as far east as Diu (India). After Sulaiman, Selim II (1566-1574) continued to challenge the naval power of Spain, Portugal and Venice. In 1571 Cyprus was captured from Venice. The Ottomans proceeded to lay siege to the island of Malta. But the defending garrison withstood the assault. The successful resistance encouraged the European powers. Urged by Pope Pius V, the combined navies of Spain, Venice and the Vatican joined battle. On October 7, 1571, the Christian navies squared off against the powerful Ottoman navy at Lepanto, off the coast of Greece. Losses were heavy on both sides but the Christian navies had the upper hand. The remnant of the Ottoman navy was forced to withdraw to Istanbul.

The Battle of Lepanto was a benchmark in world affairs. It broke the naval initiative of the Ottomans. Combined with the unfolding events in Morocco where the Sa’adids successfully spurned the Ottoman advances, it confined Turkish naval power to the eastern Mediterranean. The Ottomans would no longer be a credible threat in the western Mediterranean or the Atlantic. In time, the Dutch and the British would displace the Iberian powers. Before the Battle of Lepanto, the odds were even for a Muslim penetration of the Atlantic. After Lepanto, these odds disappeared. The road to America was controlled by Spain and Portugal. American history would henceforth be determined by the interaction of Europe with the New World.

The Ottomans did make a supreme effort to rebuild their navy. Within a year, the Turkish navy was back in action. In 1572, the Turkish admiral Uluj Pasha held off a combined assault by the European navies. Meanwhile, taking advantage of a respite from Turkish pressure, Spain occupied Tunis (1571). But the Ottomans retook it for good the following year. Thereafter, Tunisia was to remain in the Muslim camp until the colonial period of the 19th century. In 1573 Venice sued for peace and agreed to cede Cyprus and make a large payment as war indemnities. By 1585, the entire coast of North Africa from Tunisia to western Algeria was firmly in Turkish hands.

Thus ended the Spanish attempt in the 16th century to conquer and colonize North Africa. It had started as a spillover of the conquest of Granada under Isabella and Ferdinand. It ended in failure because the Ottoman navy proved to be just strong enough to frustrate their designs. However, the Battle of Lepanto ensured that Ottoman naval power would be contained within the eastern Mediterranean. The Atlantic Ocean, and America, would belong to the West Europeans.

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As for bravery.
"...., as private Aníbal Milhais (also known as "Soldado Milhões" ["A Soldier as good as a million others" in his commanding officer's words]) defended all alone the retreating allied forces with nothing but his machine gun, allowing them to fall back and regroup. Once he ran out of bullets, he escaped the battlefield, after defeating two German regiments and forcing the remaining German forces to go around him, finding impossible to defeat what they believed to be an heavily armed post, yet, he got lost along the way, having to eat nothing but sweet-almonds his family had sent him from Portugal for three days. Lost and exhausted, he was able to rescue a Scottish major from drowning in a swamp. This major led him to the Allied camp and told everyone Milhais' deeds."

Still for bravery.
The bullet that was a tooth

It is sometimes in chronicles written by foreigners that for some centuries have studied Portuguese History, that some interesting details are found.

A Dutch priest, Philippus Baldaeus, who accompanied the Dutch fleets that fought the Portuguese in the Indic Ocean, tells a most interesting story:
During the first Siege of Diu, a Portuguese soldier who was manning one of the bastions of the fortress that was being attacked by theTurks, found himself as the only survivor, having used all bullets but still having some gun powder for one more shot, and finding nothing else to charge his firearm with, decided to extract one of his own tooth and armed the weapon with it, firing against the enemy that was considering he was out of ammunitions.

It is just a little detail in a great battle that is readily forgotten. The Dutchman however, relates this fact with great respect for a brave warrior, which does honor to the Portuguese soldier.

Phillipus Baldaeus: “A Description of ye East India Coasts of Malabar and Coromandel” chapter X, page 533 of the English translation.

Im sure many more you will find If you want.
I like It how you use one battle as Example.


Capture of Aden (1548)
Battle of Albuera
Battle of Alcântara (1580)
Battle of Alcácer Quibir
Battle of Alfarrobeira
Battle of Aljubarrota
Battle of Almansa
Battle of Almaraz
Blockade of Almeida
Battle of Ameixial
Battle of Arroyo dos Molinos
Battle of Asseiceira
Battle of Atoleiros
Battle of Azemmour

Battle of Apósteles
Battle of Arapey
Battle of Arronches
Battle of Arroyo Grande (1818)
Battle of Carumbé
Battle of Catalán
Battle of Dabul
Battle of Ibiraocaí
Battle of India Muerta
Battle of La Gudina
Battle of Macau
Battle of Mbidizi River
Battle of Pablo Perez
Battle of River Ibicuí (1817)
Battle of Sahart
Battle of San Carlos (1817)
Battle of Santa Ana (1816)
Battle of Sauce (1816)
Battle of Tacuarembó
Battle of the Berlengas (1666)
Battle of Vilanova
Battle of Bayonne
Battle of Baçente
Battle of the Bidassoa (1813)
Battle of the Black Mountain
Battle of Boulou
Battle of Bussaco

Battle of Campo Maior
Capture of Bahia
Capture of Luanda
Capture of Malacca (1511)
Capture of Oporto
Capture of Ormuz (1507)

Capture of Ormuz (1622)
Cassard expedition
Battle of Castelo Rodrigo
Invasion of Cayenne (1809)
Battle of Cerneja
Battle of Ceuta
Battle of Cochin (1504)
Combat of Barquilla (1810)
Conquest of Asilah
Conquest of Santarém
Conquest of the Azores
Conquest of Tunis (1535)
Battle of the Côa

Battle of Elmina (1625)
Battle of Elmina (1637)

Fall of Calicut (1526)
First Battle of Guararapes
First Cevallos expedition
Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro

Battle of Gannoruwa
Battle of Garris
Battle of the Gebora
Battle of Grijó

Battle of the Hill of the Jews

Battle of Itaparica

Battle of Jarte
Battle of Jenipapo

Battle of Katole
Battle of Kitombo
Battle of Kombi

Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa
Battle of Leça
Battle of the Lines of Elvas
Siege of Lisbon (1384)
Battle of the Lys (1918)

Battle of Majadahonda
Battle of Malacca (1641)
Marracuene
Battle of Mbororé
Battle of Mbwila
Battle of Montes Claros
Battle of Montijo
Battle of Mufilo
Battle of Mulleriyawa

Battle of the Nive
Battle of Nivelle

Battle of Orthez

Battle of Ourique

Persia–Portugal war
Battle of Pirajá
Battle of Pombal
Battle of Ponte Ferreira
First Battle of Porto
Second Battle of Porto
Portuguese Conquest of Goa (1510)
Battle of Praia Bay
Battle of the Pyrenees

Battle of Randeniwela
Recapture of Angola
Recapture of Bahia
Battle of Redinha
Battle of Rio de Janeiro (1558)
Battle of Rio de Janeiro (1567)
Battle of Río Salado
Battle of Roliça
Battle of Roncesvalles (1813)
Royalist attack on Chaves

Battle of Sabugal
Battle of Salamanca
Battle of Salga
Battle of San Lorenzo de la Muga
Battle of São Mamede
Battle of Saragossa
Second Battle of Guararapes
Siege of Malacca (1606)
Battle of Sorauren
Spanish invasion of Portugal (1762)

Battle of Tabocas
Battle of Tangier (1437)
Battle of Toro
Battle of Toulouse (1814)
Battle of Trancoso

Battle of Valdevez
Battle of Valencia de Alcántara
Battle of Valverde (1385)
Battle of Vasai
Battle of Vila Velha
Battle of Villaviciosa
Battle of Vimeiro
Battle of Vitoria

Battle of Wayna Daga
West Indies Campaign 1804–1810
Battle of Wofla

This is just a few,theres is more.
Edited by ARES LVSITANO, Dec 20 2011, 03:52 PM.
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