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Romanian Faces, 1960s
Topic Started: Nov 5 2009, 08:37 PM (1,070 Views)
Toma
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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sS5wuabtG18&feature=related[/youtube]
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Crimson Guard
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Nice. Romanian sounds almost kinda Italian there.
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El Caudillo
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I thought likewise, it was something vaguely similar to how I'd heard Italian pronounced.

The second song with the pastoral scenes was almost too ominous-sounding to my non-Romanian ears for such joyous scenes, but nevertheless the song appealed to me, I enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing.

Edited by El Caudillo, Nov 5 2009, 09:33 PM.

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Crimson Guard
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You know in silly ass Hollywood they make Romanians out to be like Russians, and sound like them too, accent wise ect. Saw some "Law and Order" episode the other day and they had some bogus Romanians accents-- same thing in the "Van Helsing" film ect,lol.

Interesting video: :D

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Drooperdoo
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I remember a couple of Romanians talking, and one said, "Che Ora E?" which (in Italian) is "What time is it?" In Italian, however, the "che" is ponounced like "ke," whereas the Romanians used the English "CH" sound. "Chay Ora Eh?"
They said a few more things, which I understood with about an 80% accuracy rate. They were surprised that I understood them and asked if I was Romanian. I said, "No, I just spoke a few Romance languages and it was easy to figure out what they were saying".
I then checked out a Romanian language book. I was surprised by how much Slavic influence Romanian had. They were more likely to say "da" and "nyet" than "si" and "no". lol
A bizarre hybrid language.
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Toma
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^ Actually is da and nu.
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Drooperdoo
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Thanks, Toma.

Da and Nu.

Romanian is the only Romance language I know of that retains the letter U for the Latin "-us". Almost all the others turned the "-us" into an "o". Albinus became "albino"; annus became "anno," etc.

It's always easy to determine a Romanian surname because of that. If you see a name like Antonescu or Ceauşescu, you know it's Romanian.
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The Sicilian language still retains the " u ". In fact, it is believed that Sicilian is the first Romance language descended from Vulgar Latin.
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Toma
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And Latin "sic" which turned into "si" in Italian turned into "şi" into Romanian, meaning "and".
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zeta
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Did Romanian make a transformation and change lots of slavic words to latin words in recent years?

This is Dinarid. If they don't look like this, then they ain't Dinarid.
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Toma
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Yes and no. In the XIXth century there was a large input of French words, meant to re-Latinise the language, but also to illustrate new realities. The Slavic words either survived alongside the French/Latin ones (we have both nadejde and speranta for hope, or prietenie and amicitie for friendship), or died a normal death once the feudal realities they represented disappeared.

Communism brought on a new input of Slavic words, like colhoz, tovaras, camarad, etc. but they are't used anymore for obvious reasons.
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aherne
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zeta
Mar 1 2011, 04:19 AM
Did Romanian make a transformation and change lots of slavic words to latin words in recent years?

Yes, our beautiful language was vandalized by hugely complexed intellectuals in 1800s who thought we descend from Romans and thus we should "modernize" our language by ejecting Slavic vocabulary from common use and replace it with TOTALLY foreign neo-Latin constructions (imported slavishly from French, without even passing through Romanian sound rules). The result was a hybrid language, where cultured speech is a mixture of Romanian and French, whereas the one you hear people speaking on the streets is still largely Romanian (hence with many South Slavic words).

Slavic influence in Old Romanian was largely one of vocabulary and phonology, a natural result of many centuries of cohabitation between Romanians and Slavs. The basic everyday vocabularity has always been overwhelmingly Latinate. To give you an image of how our language used to be, the earliest Romanian text (Neacsu's Letter, cca 1500s) barely contains any Slavic word (15 out of 190 words used), three hundred years before the latinate fever. So our language hardly needed any further "latinization".
Edited by aherne, Mar 1 2011, 09:14 PM.
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