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The Interesting Maps Thread
Topic Started: Dec 4 2016, 01:43 PM (786 Views)
CJ
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Here's a thread for the map geeks. Simply post any interesting maps you find here - whether they be physical, political, economic, or whatever else that takes your fancy :P . (Of course, a thread like this will cover content that could sensibly go in several different forums - but this one seemed like the best compromise!)

I'll start with this view of what the Moon would look like if it were to be terraformed, by 1Wyrmshadow1. The full-size image is massive - so I'll just post a thumbnail-sized version, and link you to the original on his DeviantArt page:

Posted Image
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CJ
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Here's one I saw a while back that I thought was amusing. It's the global geographic distribution of the common rat:

Posted Image
(Click to enlarge)

The message is clear: If you can't stand rats, then move to Alberta!
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CJ
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Okay, this next map is one I put together myself. I didn't really have anywhere else to put it, and here seemed like the most appropriate place: it's up to you to judge whether it qualifies as 'interesting' :P .

So, you're probably familiar with the Eurovision Song Contest. The idea is that each country in Europe who wishes to participate (plus a couple of non-European invitees) nominates an artist to perform a song, and then all of the participating countries award points to the ones they liked the best (other than their own). Each country has two separate sets of points to award: a panel of judges from each country awards points to their ten favourites (on a 12-10-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 scale), and each country holds a televote among its citizens (with the ten countries that received the most votes also scoring points, again on a 12-10-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 scale).

Now, I'm fine with the judge's points: they can stay as the are. I'm not so sure about the televoting points, though: getting the most votes in Russia (Estimated population: 144,221,341) is worth as much as getting the most votes in San Marino (Estimated population: 33,285). Perhaps winning the bigger countries should earn a bigger prize?

Now, in the 2017 contest, 43 teams will be participating. Since every country gives 12 points for 1st place, that would be 43 x 12 = 516 first-place points in total. But, what if I instead split those points up Electoral College-style? That is, I give each country 3 first-place points to award, and then split the rest up according to population. This is how many points winning the televote in each country would be worth:

Posted Image

A few comments on this:

  • It's not just the first-place votes that need to be split: the votes for 2nd-10th places would need to be split in a similar fashion. This could get complicated.

  • As mentioned above, countries aren't allowed to vote for themselves. With the current system, this is the same for everyone: everyone's forbidden from receiving their own 12 first-place votes, so nobody's at a disadvantage. On the other hand, with this system, Malta is forbidden from giving itself 3 first-place votes, whereas Russia is forbidden from giving itself 77 first-place votes. Doesn't this put larger countries at a disadvantage?

  • From 2015 onwards, Australia was invited to participate. What if the next guest country is India or China? Either country would completely screw up this system, as each one has a population greater than the rest of the competitors combined. Perhaps there would need to be a hard cap on the number of first-place votes a particular country can have (say, 100).

  • Perhaps more to the point, I'm not sure how well this system meets the aims of the Eurovision Song Contest to begin with. Their aims seem to be more about transcending cultural boundaries than about winning over the most people. (That being said, some of these countries have a lot of cultural diversity within their own borders: Russia has a whole load of indigenous groups with populations greater than that of San Marino....)
Oh well, I'm not trying to make a serious case for this system here: it's really just me having a bit of fun :P !
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Pyrite
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Wow, that's quite a curious system! I'm not sure how much of a fan I am of electoral college style voting, but hey, if they're going to try it out on anything in Europe, they might as well try it out on Eurovision :P

Also, I'm so moving to Alberta. Rats aren't my favourite animals!!!
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CJ
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Here's an 'upside-down' map of the world:

Posted Image
(Source: http://www.deceptology.com/2010/04/upside-down-world-map-shows-north-is-up.html)

The first time I saw it (at school, in my Geography teacher's office), I thought it was some kind of weird novelty item. Over time, however, I've come to prefer it over the standard world maps with North at the top, and the Prime Meridian in the centre. Instead of sticking Americas on one side, with thousands of kilometres of ocean separating them from Eurasia and Africa, it shows how all of the continents are linked together, either directly by land or by chains of islands. It's as though there's an implicit message in this: all of humanity is connected.

(Granted, it shoves the United Kingdom off into a corner, and makes us look small and insignificant, but I think that's a small price to pay for the above. Besides, we've had plenty of time looking powerful and important in the middle of world maps. It's time to give someone else - for example, Australia - a turn :P !)

(And, yes, I know it's a few years out of date - but that shouldn't detract from the basic idea here!)
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CJ
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How to say 'Beer' in every country in Europe:

Posted Image
(Click to enlarge; Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/map-how-to-say-beer-around-europe-2013-7?IR=T)

Why do we need so many different words for it in the UK :P ?
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Jarkko
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Interesting how Bulgarian is the only Slavic language that doesn't use something resembling "pivo." Even its closest relative, Macedonian, is on the Slavic bandwagon. :P
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Nick
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[ *  *  * ]
The most commonly used languages used around the world, sourced from 100B conversations.

Posted Image

EDIT: Found another.

Posted Image
Edited by Nick, Aug 7 2017, 11:06 PM.
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CJ
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Wow, I'm surprised there isn't more interest in the eclipse in Illinois, given that it actually passes through the southern part of the state! (I'm guessing people from Chicago just aren't interested, and that's skewing the statistics?)

I love that linguistic map - although, it looks as though North Korea isn't very talkative :( .....
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Nick
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CJ
Aug 7 2017, 11:16 PM
Wow, I'm surprised there isn't more interest in the eclipse in Illinois, given that it actually passes through the southern part of the state! (I'm guessing people from Chicago just aren't interested, and that's skewing the statistics?)
Sounds likely. When it comes to grouping even somewhat different groups of people together, (in this case, Illinois) I think we underestimate how much the smaller population groups within that larger group can vary. See below:

Posted Image
(source)

Your hypothesis appears correct.
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Nick
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Internet usage based on percentage of population:

Spoiler: click to toggle


My criticism of this visualization is that there's no easy way to compare relative percentages without constantly glancing back at the legend. Better would be to have the colors of the ranging internet percentages consist of a gradient of only two colors.
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CJ
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Yeah, same.

Honestly, I'm surprised that Canada, the USA, Australia and New Zealand all still have over 10% of the population off the internet!
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Nick
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I had the same thought.
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CJ
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Here's the most-hated food in each state:

Posted Image
(Click to enlarge; Source: https://www.yahoo.com/news/map-shows-food-people-hate-141219408.html)
Edited by CJ, Aug 26 2017, 10:58 AM.
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Gaomon274
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"Pumpkin Spice Anything"
LOL
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Nick
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CJ
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Some surprises on that map. I understand all of the main North American countries using "y = mx + b", but I don't get why Portugal is the only European country using that?!

It doesn't even look like it's some odd quirk of the Portuguese language: if it was, then I'd expect Brazil to be using that as well (which it doesn't).

Then there's Ethiopia and Eritrea. I'm very surprised that they use different systems, when Eritrea only became independent from Ethiopia 24 years ago. (I get that separatists often try to play up their linguistic and cultural differences with the nation they wish to separate from - but I wouldn't expect that phenomenon to manifest itself in the equation of a straight line, of all things :lol: !)

Finally, I'm a bit surprised by the lack of consistency among the Nordic countries, and the lack of consistency within the Arab world.
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Jarkko
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CJ
Aug 26 2017, 10:58 AM
Here's the most-hated food in each state:

Posted Image
(Click to enlarge; Source: https://www.yahoo.com/news/map-shows-food-people-hate-141219408.html)
ROFL... yeah, about this:

- It rather amazes me that Washington would hate K-Cups. They're a huge deal in BC, just north of them! :P
- not as big a surprise that Oregon hates fast food or that California hates Chick-Fil-A.
- Makes sense that Kansas hates shellfish, considering it's smack in the middle of the contiguous 48 states. :lol:
- South Dakota hates expensive cheese plates? Well, all the more for me.
Posted Image
- In complete solidarity with Montana, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Massachussets. ;) Especially Virginia. Overly greasy pizza is why I stopped liking Pizza Hut in a real hurry.
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Nick
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Hiring shortages throughout the United States


Some London maps! (page-stretching)
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CJ
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Wow, with all the lawyers in the USA already, I'm surprised that there's anywhere in the country that needs even more :lol: !

I'm also surprised that anywhere has a shortage of software developers, since it's something that any reasonably intelligent person can be trained to do, and I thought it was pretty popular.

Interesting maps of London too. I quite like these "second most common" maps: they show what's going on underneath the surface that might not be immediately apparent. (Although, in the case of Tower Hamlets, the map isn't showing the second most common religion: according to the 2011 Census, Tower Hamlets was 34.5% Muslim, 27.1% Christian, and 19.1% non-religious; most of the remainder refused to answer. It also wouldn't surprise me if there were a couple of boroughs where the non-religious outnumbered Christians)
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Nick
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CJ
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Ouch, that's quite a lot.

I'm not exactly on poverty wages myself, and there are still a fair number of states I couldn't afford to own a house in....(though, I am guessing I'd be able to afford to live in their rural areas, at least)
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CJ
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Here's a whole bunch of maps showing the differences between everyday terms in different parts of America:
http://discovermagazine.com/galleries/2013/june/regional-us-language-dialect

Posted Image
(Source: Joshua Katz / Above link)

I call them 'fizzy drinks'....so, I guess I wouldn't fit in anywhere in America :( .
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Nick
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CJ
Sep 14 2017, 07:04 PM
I guess I wouldn't fit in anywhere in America :( .
Might be a good thing.

Spoiler: click to toggle


Spoiler: click to toggle
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CJ
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Wow. So, if Uttar Pradesh were to become independent, it'd have the 5th-highest population of any country :O ?

I suppose I shouldn't be that surprised, since India's population is humongous, but it really puts it into perspective just how large it is!
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Nick
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Jarkko
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Wow, I didn't realise that South Korea was so stringent with its int@rw3bz. :whatthecrap:
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CJ
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Nor did I.

I'm also surprised to see: a) the number of dictatorships and otherwise-authoritarian regimes that apparently don't bother with internet surveillance, and b) the UK and the USA lagging so far behind the rest of the West. (Although, come to think of it, we have had quite a few stories about people being arrested for making offensive comments online - which, I guess may have factored into this)

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Jarkko
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I'm surprised Turkey isn't higher up, too, what with that incredibly stupid "Insulting Turkishness" law of theirs and all.

I can't copy the link from the page for this map, so I'll just post the page link here. A language map of New Guinea and the surrounding area. New Guinea is the most linguistically diverse area in the world, with around a thousand languages spoken just there!
Edited by Jarkko, Sep 29 2017, 05:03 PM.
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Nick
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