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Dr. King didn't blindly support one political party
Topic Started: Oct 27 2016, 10:23 PM (11,223 Views)
Mitch

When I look at blacks today, they are the complete opposite of Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. King didn't blindly support one political party, Dr. King gave both political parties pure hell.

Dr. King was open minded and he never put himself in a box.

Martin Luther King Jr knew how to work with both political parties to get what he wanted.

If you don't know how to get what you want from both political parties, then you have no business dealing with politics.

A lot of black people today have a negative view of Republican Richard Nixon, but Dr. King and Richard Nixon met in Ghana (Africa) and they became good friends. Nixon worked to strengthen the Civil Rights Bill of 1957, taking on such powerful Democrats as Richard Russell, who opposed it.

Most blacks voted against Republican Dwight Eisenhower, but Dr. King voted for Dwight Eisenhower.

Democrat Adlai Stevenson got 61% of the black vote when he ran for president, and Republican Eisenhower got 39% of the black vote, but Dr. King voted for Eisenhower.

Dwight Eisenhower was the first president that invited Dr. King to the White House.

Dr. King praised Dwight Eisenhower for sending in federal troops to desegregate Central High School in Little Rock Arkansas.

This is Dr. King and Richard Nixon together. That's Republican Senator Irving M. Ives standing next to Dr. King.

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Dr. King and his wife together with Nixon.

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This is Dr. King and Civil Rights leader A. Philip Randolph together with Republican president Dwight Eisenhower at the white house. Eisenhower signed the 1957 Civil Rights Act into law, he also signed the Civil Rights Act of 1960 into law.

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Dr. King worked closely with Republican Governor Nelson Rockefeller, who later became Gerald Ford vice president. They developed a very close friendship. Rockefeller put up the bail money to get the children protesters out of jail in Birmingham Alabama, in 1963.

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Dr King and Nelson Rockefeller outside of Dr. King's Ebenezer Baptist church greeting the congregation on October 17 1965, Rockeller delivered the sermon at Dr. King church on that day.

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Martin Luther King Jr spoke at the Republican Convention in San Francisco in 1964, shown in the picture below. He spoke there to get support for the Civil Rights bill. Most Republicans voted in favor of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and most Republicans voted in favor of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. Their votes helped those two bills to pass, because many Democrats voted against those two bills.

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Dr. King meeting with Republican Senator Everett Dirksen before the 1963 March on Washington. Dirksen was one of the main people that wrote the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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Republican Mitt Romney's father Governor George Romney was a big supporter of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. This is Dr. King together with Mitt Romney's mother Lenore.

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As the leader of the SCLC Dr. King maintained a policy of not publicly endorsing any political party or candidate.

Below are some quotes where Dr. King explains why he doesn't line up with any political party.

I feel someone must remain in the position of non-alignment, so that he can look objectively at both parties and be the conscience of both—not the servant or master of either. I don't think the Republican party is a party full of the almighty God nor is the Democratic party. They both have weaknesses ... And I'm not inextricably bound to either party.

This quote is from an interview that Dr. King gave when he was released from the Georgia State Prison at Reidsville.

(I would not at this point endorse any candidate because of the non-partisan position that I follow).

This is a quote from Dr King, on whether he would endorse a candidate. This quote is from the King Papers.

I have been asked from many quarters whether it is my intention to endorse one of the presidential candidates. The organization of which I am president, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, from its inception and in its constitution has been non-partisan. Accordingly, as its titular head, I am unable to endorse a political party or its candidate. Moreover, the role that is mine in the emerging social order of the South and America demands that I remain non-partisan. This, devoid of partisan political attachments, I am free to be critical of both parties when necessary.

This is a quote from the Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr, he explains why he refuse to endorse politicians.

I made it a point not to endorse any candidate publicly, the SCLC we are a non-partisan organization. Frankly I did not feel at that time that there was much difference, between Kennedy and Nixon. I could find some things in the background of both men that I didn’t agree with. I never came out with an endorsement for either party. I took this position in order to maintain a non-partisan posture. Which I have followed all along, in order to be able to look objectively at both parties, at all times.

Below is a quote from Dr. King wife Coretta Scott King book called, My Life with Martin Luther King Jr.

(My husband had a policy of not endorsing presidential candidates).

Dr. King letter praising Dwight Eisenhower https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/dwight-d-eisenhower

Dr. King friendship with Richard Nixon http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/21/when-martin-luther-king-jr-and-richard-nixon-were-friends.html

Dr. King met with Republican Donald Rumsfeld in the 1960's, Rumsfeld was a Congressman during that time. Dr. King met with Rumsfeld and other Republicans to get support for the Civil Rights Bill. There were large numbers of Democrats voting against that bill, preventing that bill from passing. Dr. King needed the support of Republicans to put that bill over the top. Donald Rumsfeld and most Republicans voted in favor of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and their vote helped that bill to pass.
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Jose Martinez

Wise people tend not to blindly support one political party. Because when you do that you give all of your political power away.
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Stephanie

We need some black leaders like Martin Luther King Jr today, he was very intelligent and he had an open mind.
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Marcus
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Martin Luther King Jr had good sense, and he didn't operate off of emotion like a lot of blacks do today.
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New York
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Dr King is the opposite of these so called black leaders today.
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Mitch

This is Mitt Romney's father George Romney participating in a Civil Rights march.

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This is Mitt Romney's father George and his wife at Dr. King's funeral, that's Dick Gregory sitting next to them. That's Richard Nixon sitting behind them.

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Stephanie

The more that I read about Martin Luther King Jr, the more that I realize that we don't have any real black leaders today.
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Big Mike

What I love about this information is, it shows that Dr. King was an opened minded person. In that quote Dr. King said that he's NOT BOUND to any political party.
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Big Mike

By not endorsing or belonging to any political party, that gave Dr. King power and leverage, and he used that leverage to get what he wanted from both political parties.

A very smart man.
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Travis

Great information.
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