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Mitt Romney father supported Dr. King
Topic Started: Oct 24 2011, 06:44 PM (11,267 Views)
Brad
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I found out something today that I never knew before. Mitt Romney father George Romney was the Governor of Michigan, and he was a big supporter of Civil Rights and Dr. King. Below is a picture of Mitt Romney's mother Lenore and Dr. King together.

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This is Mitt Romney's father George and his mother Lenore below particpating in a Civil Rights march.


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George Romney went to Martin Luther King Jr funeral.

http://mittromneyroadtothewhitehouse.blogspot.com/2007/12/gov-george-romney-dr-martin-luther-king.html

George Romney Civil Rights record.

Michigan Historical Review of civil-rights progress under Romney

“... Fine notes that both Governors Williams and Swainson faced the same hurdle: a mostly insensitive, doctrinaire state legislature that continually blocked their attempts to pass meaningful civil rights legislation.

“With the election of the moderate Republican George Romney as governor, however, the state moved to the forefront of civil rights leadership. National civil rights events pushed state events, and Romney's tenure coincided with federal civil rights legislation, notably the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. One of Romney's significant advantages in his fight to enact civil rights legislation stemmed from his consummate effectiveness at working with the state legislature. Consequently, beginning in 1963 with a new state constitution that included a state civil rights commission, Romney succeeded in getting the legislature to pass remarkable civil rights legislation...

“The author concludes that certain qualities coalesced in Republican Governor George Romney that enabled him to oversee a remarkable civil rights evolution in Michigan. These included his ability to use the country's national civil rights events to good advantage and his political skills, such as moderation and bipartisanship. In addition, Romney could rely on Attorney General Frank J. Kelley's uncompromising support for the state's aggressive civil rights commission that gave the commission ultimate authority to resolve civil rights complaints. Although Fine certainly promotes Romney's success, the author does not play favorites; he also discusses the other crucial players in Michigan's civil rights efforts...

“In this book, Fine certainly shows the importance of a state's efforts in winning civil rights for its citizens. Because the author also judiciously uses the seemingly endless lists of statistics and facts to guide, rather than to overwhelm, the reader, he ultimately presents an intriguing and informative narrative. Fine portrays Michigan, a midwestern state not usually associated with remarkable, innovative civil rights legislation, as a national civil rights leader in the 1960s. By highlighting an area of civil rights history that is not well known, Fine alerts historians to the need to consider the wealth of state and local information that is sometimes overlooked in the large national civil rights story. With vigorous, insightful and bipartisan leadership, Michigan produced an accomplished civil rights record for its citizenry and for the nation.”

"Expanding the Frontiers of Civil Rights": Michigan, 1948-1968 by Sidney Fine. Michigan Historical Review, Spring 2001, copyright Clarke Historical Library

(George Romney was governor of Michigan from Jan 1963 to Jan 1969.)
Romney enshrined and enforced civil-rights thru a new state constitution

Pushed for, promised and created a new state constitution:

“... George argued that the problem could only be resolved with the enactment of a new state constitution. He subsequently formed Citizens for Michigan, a nonpartisan citizens group. This broad-based organization was designed to give the Michigan state government the kind of total makeover that CACSND [Citizens Advisory Committee on School Needs in Detroit] had given the Detroit school system. The group's first charge was to organize a constitutional convention wherein a new state constitution could be drafted.

“From 1959 through 1962, Citizens for Michigan looked into the needs of the Michigan populace, studied new ways of state financing, and prepared a model for the new state constitution. Not everyone was in favor of overhauling the government, however, and incumbent Democratic Governor John Swainson spoke out against the proposed changes in his bid for re-election. It became apparent that nothing would be done unless a governor committed to reform was elected. On February 10, 1962, after a day of contemplation and prayer, George announced his candidacy for the governors office...

“George became the first Republican governor elected in the state since 1948...

“He had promised the voters to bring a new constitution to Michigan, a promise he kept.”

George W. Romney Institute of Public Management


Placed housing civil-rights in constitution:

“President Nixon tapped then Governor of Michigan, George Romney, for the post of Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. While serving as Governor, Secretary Romney had successfully campaigned for ratification of a state constitutional provision that prohibited discrimination in housing.”

HUD.gov - History of Fair Housing

Placed civil-rights commission in constitution:

“George Romney has always believed in equal rights for all citizens, and his record of action is unchallenged. No one has demonstrated more conclusively his refusal to compromise on this basic American principle. In 1962 he helped write the provision for the country's only constitutionally established state Civil Rights Commission. As Governor, George Romney fought for and obtained appropriations to make the new Commission more effective. Under his leadership, Michigan is a leader in providing equal opportunities to all, in employment housing, education and public accommodations.”

myclob.pbwiki.com - George Romney - Dynamic equal opportunities record

“Romney spoke glowingly of the civil rights provision of the new constitution, scheduled to take effect at the beginning of 1964:

“ "Come January 1, 1964 all forms of discrimination in Michigan are to end... This document is the clearest, strongest, most complete statement of civil rights of any constitution in the land."

“This end to discrimination, Romney said, will be ushered in and conducted by a Civil Rights Commission, which he will appoint in the near future.

“Romney concluded, "We can in Michigan, on the basis of this new fundamental law, provide a leadership for every other state to follow." ”

Grosse Pointe News, front page - July 4, 1963

“I look back in awe at his bold efforts to make state government serve our citizens better. His contributions to Michigan's current constitution were unparalleled; his commitment to civil rights, ahead of its time; his determination to making government more accessible to the people, a model for every chief executive in the nation.”

Michigan State Government Press Release - Gov John Engler on George Romney
Romney fought hard for a stronger national civil-rights platform

As governor, George Romney withheld support from the Republican presidential candidate throughout the 1964 presidential campaign because he was not strong enough in his support of civil rights. He also was unhappy about the 1964 "convention's failure to adopt a strong civil rights plank".

Time.com - Where George Was

The plank was brief but supportive of civil rights, but not as strong as he felt it needed to be.

Time.com 1964 Republican Platform

“In 1964 Romney stood up to the Republican Party, demanding it take a stronger stand on civil rights. He famously walked out on Barry Goldwater's acceptance speech at the GOP convention.”

Mitt Romney: The Man, His Values, and His Vision by Lisa Ray Turner, Kimberly Field, 2007, pg 4

“Michigan Gov. George Romney, campaigned alongside former US Sen. Ed Brooke and both father and son walked out of the 1964 GOP national convention after a civil rights plank was blocked.”

Daily News Transcript - Sep 26, 2002

Fought for fair housing on the national level

“In 1969 George Romney, secretary of housing, began Operation Breakthrough, an attempt to open the suburbs to people on low incomes, including African-Americans. Thus when Warren, a suburb of Detroit, applied for federal money for urban renewal, Romney made it clear that the availability of federal funds would be directly related to Warren's willingness to accept a low-income project...

“Opposition to Romney's strategies reached such a pitch of intensity that the administration of Richard Nixon (1969-1974) felt obligated to renounce policies intended to achieve suburban integration.”

African-Americans and the Quest for Civil Rights, 1900-1990 by Sean Dennis, pg 212-213


“Whitbeck and his colleagues at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development had the job of a lifetime: trying to help secretary George Romney open the all-white suburbs of Detroit and other major cities to black homeowners.”

Detroit News Special Report - Jan 14, 2002

(archived page — original link expired)


“Governor George Romney after a visit to Watts in the fall of 1967...”

Organized Labor and the Black Worker, 1619-1973 by Philip Sheldon Foner, pg 375


More than 100 angry white protesters balked at efforts by then-Housing Secretary George Romney, in car, to open their new neighborhoods to blacks.

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Governor Romney proclaimed days commemorating civil rights
including official days of mourning for slain civil-rights heroes

“On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis, Tenn., where he had gone to lead a civil rights march. The following day, Michigan Gov. George Romney declared an official period of mourning for King. The period extended through King's funeral. Romney ordered all flags on public buildings to be flown at half staff and asked that the same be done on private buildings. Gov. Romney, in an official statement, said: "The assassination of Martin Luther King is a great national tragedy. At a time when we need aggressive nonviolent leadership to peacefully achieve equal rights, equal opportunities and equal responsibilities for all, his leadership will be grievously missed." ”

The Detroit News 4/4/67 - Rearview Mirror: Detroit Reacts To King's Assassination as quoted in Time.com


“The Walk to Freedom was a tremendous success. It was held on Sunday, June 23, 1963. Some 125,000 peaceful demonstrators took part and raised more than $40,000 for the cause. State and local officials, including Mayor Jerome C. Cavanaugh, took part. Governor George Romney did not march because he did not engage in politics on the Sabbath, but he did declare Sunday "Freedom March Day." ”

As Long as They Don't Move Next Door by Stephen G. Meyer, 2001, pg 174


Viola Liuzzo left Detroit for Alabama to participate in a 54 mile civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery that began on Sunday March 21st and finished on Thursday, March 25th, 1965. On the day it finished, she was helping transport people between Montgomery and Selma. “In Selma,... Mrs. Liuzzo had been driving civil rights workers when she was ambushed... There was a witness to the shooting,... and ballistics tests would be needed to verify what kind of weapon killed her.” (pg 136-163)

“Saturday brought the Liuzzo family the news that Governor George Romney of Michigan had declared Monday and Tuesday days of statewide mourning for Viola Liuzzo... Governor Romney spent 45 minutes with the Liuzzos and later told the press that Viola's death "reminded me of the death of Joan of Arc." Ministers throughout the city--both black and white--spoke of Viola Liuzzo's sacrifice in their Sunday sermons... Reverend Fulton Bradley of the Tabernacle Baptist Church proclaimed that "...Mrs. Liuzzo is another of the great martyrs who lived and died for a cause." Martin Luther King, who had announced that he would attend the Liuzzo funeral, appeared on Sunday's Meet the Press... The family had invited 100 guests (including Martin Luther King, Jr., who did attend), and after they were seated, others--estimated at about 150--were allowed to join them.” (pg 176-178)

The Informant by Gary May, 2005
As Governor, participated in or led civil-rights marches and rallies:
1962, '63, '64, '65 and '67

“George Romney marched in civil rights actions in 1962, '63, '64. His young son was with him on that” (Hugh Hewitt)

American Thinker - Dec 29, 2008

"Hugh Hewitt is an author, law professor and broadcast journalist." Hugh Hewitt did extensive research on Romney and wrote a book on Mitt Romney.

Hugh Hewitt Biography

[In March 1965] “Michigan governor George Romney was leading a Joshua-like march of ten thousand people five times around the Detroit federal building, and six hundred picketed a New York City FBI office to demand U.S. protection for Negro voting rights in Alabama.”

At Canaan's Edge by Taylor Branch, 2006 (vol 3 of 3-volume history) pg 74

“August, 1967: The Flint City Commission (predecessor to the City Council) voted against a fair housing ordinance, which was designed to prevent discrimination in housing. Mayor Floyd McCree, the city's first black mayor, threatened to resign. Residents staged a sleep-in in front of City Hall. Gov. George Romney showed up at a unity rally at the end of a 10-day protest, which was attended by about 4,000 people.”

The result: “The Commission reversed course and approved the ordinance, but a group against the ordinance collected petitions and forced it to go before voters... Voters approved the housing ordinance, the first of its kind approved in the nation. Flint makes national news for civil rights.”

The Flint Journal - Flint made civil rights history

“Michigan Gov. George Romney walked into a Negro Civil Rights rally in the heart of Atlanta to the chants of 'We Want Romney' and to hear protests from Negroes about city schools. 'They had invited me to come and I was interested in hearing things that would give me an insight into Atlanta,' the Michigan Republican said. Led by Hosea Williams, a top aide to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the all-Negro rally broke into shouts and song when Romney arrived. 'We're tired of Lyndon Baines Johnson,' Williams said from a pulpit in the Flipper Temple AME Church as Romney sat in a front row pew. 'Johnson is sending black boys to Vietnam to die for a freedom that never existed,' Williams said. Pointing to Romney, Williams brought the crowd of 200 to its feet when he said, 'He may be the fella with a little backbone.' Williams said Romney could be 'the next President if he acts right.' ”

The Chicago Defender 9/30/67 - Romney Praised At Civil Rights Rally as quoted in Time.com

INFORMATION RELATED TO GEORGE ROMNEY AND DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. »

http://aboutmittromney.com/georgeromney.htm

http://aboutmittromney.com/romney_and_king.htm
Edited by Brad, May 20 2012, 03:34 PM.
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Marcus
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Al Gores father was on the wrong side of history, Al Gores father voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
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TommyT
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Uhhh....Okay.
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n.W.o.
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What the hell is this thread for? Mitt Romney's a damn Mormon and Al Gore is, who the fuck is Al Gore today? Nothing. Just like this thread.
Edited by n.W.o., Oct 25 2011, 08:57 AM.
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Black Republican
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FearOfABlaqPlanet
Oct 25 2011, 08:57 AM
What the hell is this thread for? Mitt Romney's a damn Mormon and Al Gore is, who the fuck is Al Gore today? Nothing. Just like this thread.
Why did Al Gores father vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?
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n.W.o.
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Black Republican
Oct 25 2011, 01:25 PM
FearOfABlaqPlanet
Oct 25 2011, 08:57 AM
What the hell is this thread for? Mitt Romney's a damn Mormon and Al Gore is, who the fuck is Al Gore today? Nothing. Just like this thread.
Why did Al Gores father vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?
Here, let me ask Al Gore's pops. He's right beside me. Yo, Al Gore's padre, why did you vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Gore told me that he voted down some of the Acts because he was just following the lead of his Democratic buddies but when they left him to move to the Republican Party he had to follow the NEW Democrats by voting FOR other measures like the Voting Act.

It's the shit that Al Gore is even able to answer me seeing how he's been dead for the past 13 years.
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Black Republican
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Why did 96 Democrats vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?
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n.W.o.
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Black Republican
Oct 25 2011, 01:38 PM
Why did 96 Democrats vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?
I don't have 1964 Democrats on my speed dial. All of the Democrats I know became Democrats after 1970. They won't be much help. Hold on, let me check my Droid. Nope. Just Al Gore, Sr. And I already talked to him. Wait he just left me a voicemail. He asked if you were still bitching about something that happened 50 years ago. I told him you had...issues.
Edited by n.W.o., Oct 25 2011, 01:48 PM.
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Black Republican
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Here is Mitt Romney talking about his parents support of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.




Edited by Black Republican, Jan 5 2012, 12:05 PM.
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Whozthatgurl
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#ITISWHATITIS
Quote:
 
Why did Al Gores father vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

He was a democrat before the parties platforms "SWITCHED". Today he would be considered a republican.

Quote:
 
Why did 96 Democrats vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964?


Same answer as above....
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