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[Member Project] Skatha: Sapients and other fauna; The planet Skatha is home to many lifeforms including the sentient and intelligent Gapuri.
Topic Started: Dec 20 2011, 12:12 AM (15,191 Views)
Amoeboid
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Hey Spec-Evo I'm new here, and here's what I've been working on. (also forgive me if I post this in the wrong section, haven't quite found my way around the site yet)

The planet Skatha was discovered in the Earth year 2352 due to a surprise opening of a wormhole outside our solar system. Jumping on the chance to explore a natural and stable wormhole we sent a autonomous probe through. The probe was equipped with all manner of sensors specialized in detecting gasses and the like. It also has several onboard cameras and heat sensors.
In a summarized version, the probe went through the wormhole, took pictures, picked up the presence of a near-by star and investigated. When the probe returned to Earth the findings were shocking and unexpected, as a solar system was discovered. At the time we did not know that any planet had life on it, only that there was a planet in the Habitable Zone. Naturally we sent out a manned probe, it was volunteer only, as we did not know the effects of wormhole travel. The volunteers survived with no ill effects. A substantial crew was sent next to rendezvous with the first team in a large space shuttle. More probes were sent out to investigate further, this time with direct human observation. That is when they discovered Skatha.

Skatha was not originally called "Skatha." When the first Earth voyagers discovered the planet they called it "Terra Iterum" which means "Earth a second time." It was very Earth-like in appearance. The planet was mottled with blue patches much like Earth, but rather than green being the main dominant color reds were. Greens were present as well, the team described it as looking like a Christmas tree ornament.

Years passed as we rushed to pull together a team of scientists, astronauts, engineers, doctors and a small number of armed soldiers, to be sent to the planet's surface.

We had not expected to find what we did. Flourishing ecosystems covered the planet's surface, diverse habitats where found in all locations. The flora was primarily red, orange, pinks and purples, which was curious seeing as they did photosynthesize. There was a decent amount of greens and blues present, but red hues dominated the landscape.

It wasn't long until intelligent life was discovered. First interactions with the Indigenous were rough at first, finding communication hard, as well as a fearful and paranoid community, great precautions were taken to be sure that nothing violent happened.

It took a few years to make any head way deciphering their language, at least one of them. The group focused on a coast community that lived on a huge freshwater inland sea. The people called themselves the "Gapuri," it seemed to be a label for their entire species, not just their specific region.

The Gapuri are a large, roughly human sized species. With heights ranging between 5'4'' and 6'11'' a majority of them can look a human in the eye.

They are bipedal and mostly upright. They are digitigrade and have two sets of tentacle like arms. Their upper arms are larger and stronger, where as the smaller pair are more nimble and flexible. All arms end with a set of four fingers with the palm being somewhat rectangular in shape and a digit growing from each corner. Digits are also boneless, instead their fingers are a flexible cartilage "minispine."

They have a long, thick, prehensile tail that helps balance their somewhat top heavy torsos. Their heads are a medium length, longer than a humans but more bulbous in the front. They have a large lobe like forehead and a dextrous upper lip and split lower jaws. Their jaws are mandible like, with a joint in the middle they can grab and hold things in their jaws. However they do not use their jaws in fighting as they are somewhat delicate, like the equivalent of getting punched in the nose for us. They have two large forward facing eyes set just behind the jaw. They also have vestigial feelers that protrude from the base of their jaws on the neck. These feelers are hyper sensitive to any air or electrical currents around them. It is nearly impossible to sneak up on a Gapuri.

There is only one gender in the Gapuri, since they can only reproduce once every Skathan year (roughly 400 days), they need to be able to make up for lost reproductive time, thus both individuals in a pair will become pregnant from a single mating, this doubles the chance of one of the offspring surviving.

Most animals on Skatha reproduce this way.


Attached is an image of a Gapuri sailor, a merchant, travelling from province with goods. Depicted in a small skiff rather than her larger trading vessel, she is most likely on her way back to her homeport at the North end of the large inland sea.
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Attachments: _boatspecEVO.jpg (183.79 KB)
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urufumarukai
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A F*cking Unicorn with an Afro and a Moustache
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Welcome to the site!

It seems that your project is very well thoughtout, at least the history. Great art by the way looking forward to more.
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Spugpow
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Fantastic art, but it's a little too similar to a piece by abiogenesis: http://abiogenisis.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d3090s2

Why do the animals on Skatha reproduce so infrequently? Could it be that high levels of solar radiation make reproduction risky on all but the cloudiest days of the year (due to increased risk of harmful mutation)?

EDIT: Or maybe the day when they reproduce coincides with an annual total solar eclipse.
Edited by Spugpow, Dec 20 2011, 02:30 AM.
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Parasky
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King Wizard

I like the project, keep it up. I love your art, I agree that it looks a bit like the piece by Abiogenesis but I don't think it's that similar. At first I thought your Gapun seemed too humanoid, but after seeing the picture I have a more clear view on how they look and have come to the conclusion they are not as some here might say "humanesque." Please tell me you have more art and information on their culture and history?
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Just Watcher
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Welcome to the site, Amoeboid.
That's a well thought out history, and the alien's design has a good tone of humanoid, yet not too much. I'm interested to see why they breed so infrequently. Also, whats up next?
(and yeah, that boat does look a BIT too much like abiogenisis' work, sos. But your art work is fantastic, especially your talent in water)
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Zoroaster
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welcome - great stuff - love your artwork - and I gotta say I am more than a bit jealous.... cool stuff - can't wait for the next update - might check out the site at work tomorrow.
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Amoeboid
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urufumarukai
Dec 20 2011, 12:24 AM
Welcome to the site!

It seems that your project is very well thoughtout, at least the history. Great art by the way looking forward to more.
Thank you! I also replied a bunch to people...but I think I did it wrong haha, so I am gunna do it again. I did "fast reply" and I think I was suppose to "quote"...sorry haha, I am not good at forums yet.
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Amoeboid
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Watcher In The Puddle
Dec 20 2011, 06:36 AM
Welcome to the site, Amoeboid.
That's a well thought out history, and the alien's design has a good tone of humanoid, yet not too much. I'm interested to see why they breed so infrequently. Also, whats up next?
(and yeah, that boat does look a BIT too much like abiogenisis' work, sos. But your art work is fantastic, especially your talent in water)
Also, sorry in advance if I am reposting replies, I don't think I did it right the first time.

Yeah I'm seeing that now. However I used real boats and stuff when it came to reference haha, I've always loved the hide boats though. So I tend to draw them a lot, but I'm not going to argue points on how they look different or similar. I love Abiogenesis's work, but I hardly ever reference his pictures.

and I'm just going to cut and paste what I replied to the other person who asked about the mating. I'll write a full post on this late as well.

As for the mating issue, it has to do with seasons. Skatha has some rather severe weather changes, on the continent that this particular individual lives on, which is called Suuth, is the hottest of the continents. The inland sea provides an oasis for flora and fauna alike, but the temperatures can soar above 130 in the hottest time of the year. During the dry season is their mating period, that way they give birth the cooler time of the year. The adults can handle the heat, but the young are weaker when they are first born, it takes them about a year to fully develop thick enough skin to insulate their internal organs from the sweltering conditions.

If the Gapuri where to have a child during the hot season it would almost surely die within a few days even if kept in the shade. Their brain would overheat and their internal organs would shut down.
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Amoeboid
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Spugpow
Dec 20 2011, 02:28 AM
Fantastic art, but it's a little too similar to a piece by abiogenesis: http://abiogenisis.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d3090s2

Why do the animals on Skatha reproduce so infrequently? Could it be that high levels of solar radiation make reproduction risky on all but the cloudiest days of the year (due to increased risk of harmful mutation)?

EDIT: Or maybe the day when they reproduce coincides with an annual total solar eclipse.
Sorry in advance if I am double posting replies...I think i did it wrong the first time.

I don't really see the resemblance between the two pieces honestly, other than the fact that they are on boats. The Gapuri and Abiogenesis's species don't look remotely similar (though you can't really see the body of the Gapuri here..)
And if it makes you feel any better I used real boats as reference for the boat I've painted, but I can see how the two boats may look a little similar...

And as for the mating issue, it has to do with seasons. Skatha has some rather severe weather changes, on the continent that this particular individual lives on, which is called Suuth, is the hottest of the continents. The inland sea provides an oasis for flora and fauna alike, but the temperatures can soar above 130 in the hottest time of the year. During the dry season is their mating period, that way they give birth the cooler time of the year. The adults can handle the heat, but the young are weaker when they are first born, it takes them about a year to fully develop thick enough skin to insulate their internal organs from the sweltering conditions.

If the Gapuri where to have a child during the hot season it would almost surely die within a few days even if kept in the shade. Their brain would overheat and their internal organs would shut down.
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Amoeboid
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Magoo
Dec 20 2011, 07:03 AM
welcome - great stuff - love your artwork - and I gotta say I am more than a bit jealous.... cool stuff - can't wait for the next update - might check out the site at work tomorrow.
Thank you I am glad you are interested!
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Amoeboid
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Parasky
Dec 20 2011, 03:18 AM
I like the project, keep it up. I love your art, I agree that it looks a bit like the piece by Abiogenesis but I don't think it's that similar. At first I thought your Gapun seemed too humanoid, but after seeing the picture I have a more clear view on how they look and have come to the conclusion they are not as some here might say "humanesque." Please tell me you have more art and information on their culture and history?
Sorry if I am replying again, i think i replied wrong the first time...

They are I guess slightly humanoid in the way that they walk on two legs, however that's where most similarities end. Plus they walk a little more hunched over and tend to use their larger upper arms as legs as well when moving around.

I do have more art and I have stuff on their history and culture as well, however it is in a pretty rough stage right now, just a bunch of notes and sketches and the like.

I am about to update now actually, I have a little more info on some organs and stuff.

Glad you're interested!
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Mike
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Glad to see you've decided to join us! I patiently await further information on the gapuri, which by the way, I'm very interested as to how it's properly pronounced. You say the g is like a click towards the back of the throat, are you talking about a legitimate click consonant or an ejective, perhaps even an implosive? Non-linguists tend to use the term click to refer to any of these. A click is when you pull your tongue away from the roof of your mouth to make a clicking noise. An ejective is when you force air out using your glottis rather than your lungs or tongue, so it sounds sort of like saying a normal consonant but really fast. An implosive is when you breathe in instead of out, some people think it sounds like gagging. Do any of these seem to be what you're talking about?
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Amoeboid
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Mike
Dec 20 2011, 02:29 PM
Glad to see you've decided to join us! I patiently await further information on the gapuri, which by the way, I'm very interested as to how it's properly pronounced. You say the g is like a click towards the back of the throat, are you talking about a legitimate click consonant or an ejective, perhaps even an implosive? Non-linguists tend to use the term click to refer to any of these. A click is when you pull your tongue away from the roof of your mouth to make a clicking noise. An ejective is when you force air out using your glottis rather than your lungs or tongue, so it sounds sort of like saying a normal consonant but really fast. An implosive is when you breathe in instead of out, some people think it sounds like gagging. Do any of these seem to be what you're talking about?
Good question! I suppose the click description was a bit vague. It's hard to describe to other people, I've got it all worked out in my head how they pronounce things, but that doesn't really help anyone does it? Anyway, they have multiple ways of saying certain letters or syllables (which in their language can be shown as a single symbol). I'll focus on "g" for now.

They use a combination of their throat muscles and back of the tongue to create the "g" sound in "Gapuri." The constrict the top of their throats, sealing off the esophagus and trachea, and push their tongue back to create a bubble, which they pop loudly when they move their tongue down and forward while raising the back of their tongue, this moves the bubble forward. This expels the sound forward out of the mouth rather than backwards into the throat.

Bubbles are used somewhat frequently to create different types of sounds. Their language is not made up entirely of sounds they make with their vocal cords, they also use jaw clacking, tongue clicking, and gusts of air to create whistle noises.
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trex841
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this looks cool. love to know what that other animal is.
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Amoeboid
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Here's a head shot of a Gapuri.

And some info on the feelers.

The feeler is actually a somewhat of a vestigial organ, similar to the way we have an appendix but it doesn't really serve a purpose. Though the feelers are still very sensitive and serve their original purpose, even if the more evolved Gapuri don't need them as much. With the hairs you see along it they can pick up changing air currents from something or someone that moved, and along the flesh there are tiny pores that pick up electrical currents, much like the pores along the nose of a shark.

It's speculated that the organ is a left over from when their ancestors needed to feel their way through thick vegetation, caves, or find their way around when it's dark.

In the modern Gapuri times though it is used in other ways such as body language and greetings. For instance touching the feelers together can be a show of complete trust or a deep friendship, however it is almost exclusively used when partners greet each other, the intimate touch reaffirms the bond between them. It is believed that their ancestors may have done the same thing. When two feelers touch the electrical senses are almost overloaded, and sends a series of intense signals to the brain. It seems that this is an evolutionary trick that releases a hormone that is designed to keep a pair of Gapuri together, rather than straying from their partner for another.
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