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How smart were troodonts?
Topic Started: Dec 19 2011, 08:02 PM (1,079 Views)
Zorcuspine
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HOENN CONFIRMED

We all know about the dinosauroids. But how intelligent were the REAL troodonts?
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urufumarukai
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AND I WILL ALWAYS LOOOOOVEEEE YOUUUUUU
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I think it's impossible to truly know, we can guess but that's about it
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JohnFaa
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Adveho in mihi Lucifer
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Most likely as smart as ratites. Some people have suggested neoaves level intelligence, but I remain skeptical given how poorly received those studies tend to be.
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Zorcuspine
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HOENN CONFIRMED

I hear some people say troodonts were as smart as possums. This is weird because some people say oppusums are as smart as pigs which are even smarter than modern dogs! So I am mighty confused right now...
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FallingWhale
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Adult
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BananaBoyL337
Dec 23 2011, 06:57 PM
I hear some people say troodonts were as smart as possums. This is weird because some people say oppusums are as smart as pigs which are even smarter than modern dogs! So I am mighty confused right now...
Smart as a opossum is entity likely, but opossums are stupid by mammal standards.
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JohnFaa
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Adveho in mihi Lucifer
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Well, american opossums yes, but aussie possums are far smarter. Helps that they are not [closely] related.
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El Squibbonator
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Curse you and your sudden but inevitable betrayal!
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How do we know they were as smart as, say, ostriches, as opposed to crows or parrots?
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JohnFaa
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Adveho in mihi Lucifer
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Brain structure. The traditional method, by size, is useless as, according to those tests, crows are as smart as shorebirds; the brain structure methods has supported both ostrich level intelligence and more derived neoave level intelligence, but nowhere near the intellect of crows and parrots.
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Crimson Rider
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I just wanted to point out that all maniraptorans, not just troodontids, were probably equally intelligent. I don't remember the exact study that started it all (I believe it was in the 70s though), but I know it only examined troodontids, and nobody else. So although they're always reputed to be the smartest dinos, it's unlikely, IMO, that closely related groups like oviraptorosaurs, therizinosaurs, and other deinonychosaurs would not be as intelligent as troodonts.

But back to intelligence of troodontids only...I agree that ratites are probably comparable to troodontids, in terms of "smarts". Though it's entirely possible that a species or two may have become more intelligent.

...oh, and they wouldn't have been able to open doors even if there were doors back then, because they couldn't pronate their hands that way. Just sayin'. :P
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lamna
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They could not push their hands down? Seems rather limiting.
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T.Neo
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Translunar injection: TLI
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What kind of door are we talking about here? Cats can't turn knobs either...
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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I had a cat that could open doors... though it was best at opening the ones with handles...

as opposed to knobs if anyone was curious.
Edited by colddigger, Dec 24 2011, 06:44 PM.
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Crimson Rider
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I don't want to go off track too much, but you know that scene in Jurassic Park where the raptor opens the door to the kitchen? They couldn't do that because their hand rotation was limited. Basically they had their hands stuck in a clapping position, palms facing each other.
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El Squibbonator
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Curse you and your sudden but inevitable betrayal!
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JohnFaa
Dec 24 2011, 03:27 PM
Brain structure. The traditional method, by size, is useless as, according to those tests, crows are as smart as shorebirds; the brain structure methods has supported both ostrich level intelligence and more derived neoave level intelligence, but nowhere near the intellect of crows and parrots.
But ostriches are herbivores, and troodontids were at least omnivorous. Omnivores tend to be smarter than carnivores, which in turn are usually smarter than herbivores. I doubt troodontids, even the omnivorous ones, had the same sort of diet as ratites, so it's not really a good comparison.
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Russwallac
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"Ta-da!"
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The raptors is Jurassic Park have pronated hands, so it's a moot point anyway.
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