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What should we call the Terrestrial Macaw?
Ostran? 1 (11.1%)
Macovus? 3 (33.3%)
Maceo? 2 (22.2%)
Something else? 3 (33.3%)
Total Votes: 9
What do you think Chiroptera gigantis' Common Name should be?
Ebony Ghost 4 (66.7%)
Nightwing 1 (16.7%)
Membaros 1 (16.7%)
Greater Chiroptera 0 (0%)
Total Votes: 6
What's next to reveal/happen in the story?
A new Gecko? 0 (0%)
A Duospondylote? 0 (0%)
A Drake? 1 (12.5%)
A Hyraci? 0 (0%)
An Iguana? 0 (0%)
A new Bird? 1 (12.5%)
A reptilian group not yet discussed? 1 (12.5%)
A Rascal? 0 (0%)
A Plant? 0 (0%)
A Fungus? 0 (0%)
The Ghouls? 2 (25%)
Head North? 0 (0%)
Head East? 0 (0%)
Head South? 0 (0%)
Head West? 0 (0%)
Something from an existing group that hasn't been seen yet? 3 (37.5%)
Or a new group entirely? 0 (0%)
Total Votes: 8
Terra Aliis Discussion; Discuss what possible future evolutions could appear when Pangaea reforms on earth.
Topic Started: Oct 27 2011, 08:31 AM (4,259 Views)
Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
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Back story: in the year 200002011 Humans have long since died off from an artificially designed viral pathogen that only seemed to effect more evolved apes, but seems to have left apes like Orangutans untouched. Now Pangaea has reformed and evolution is running full-tilt in all directions.

What will come of this new world? You decide!

(Discuss what possible future evolutions could appear when Pangaea reforms on Terra.{Earth})

Posted Image

Species list:

Raging Gecko: The largest descendant of the Leopard Gecko, The Raging Gecko is the same size as the extinct Wolverine, and just as aggressive; they regularly take on big cats and predatorial chameleons, and win. Males at the height of rutting season have even been known to take on Giant Crowhawks, though these usually result in a meal for the Crowhawk. The Raging Gecko isn't actually all that different from the Leopard Gecko; other than a change in posture, teeth, and the shape of the legs and feet, the Raging Gecko is otherwise almost the same species. It has retained the ability to shed its tail, though the only time that these animals do that is when they get attacked by the Giant Crowhawks. They are spread across the tropical and subtropical regions of New Pangaea, and some subspecies even live in the temperate latitudes in the summer, and migrate in the winter.
Stats;
Length: 52 in.
Diet: Predatory
Habitat: Tropical and Subtropical regions, Subspecies; Summer: Temperate latitudes, Winter: Unknown
Location: Unknown
Notable Features: Unknown
Temporal Range: Unknown 


Giant Iguana: This widespread Iguana species is about the same size as a large pig, has the exact same temperament, and fills almost exactly the same niche. Its mouth has formed into a toothy beak, which is used in conjunction with its fore claws in digging for tubers and underground fungi. It is by no means herbivorous, however; they are passionate scavengers, even eating the dead bodies of their own kind. Their main predator is the Raging Gecko. They are usually solitary, although the males stay with their mates and help raise the hatchlings.
Stats;
Length: 10.9 ft.
Diet: Omnivorous/Scavenger
Habitat: Unknown
Location: Unknown
Notable Features: Unknown
Temporal Range: Unknown 


Hyracis: Deer-like descendants of the Hyraxes, the Hyraci are widespread across New Pangaea, and there are several different families, ranging from animals no larger than the extinct Capybara to Moose-sized giants. Oddly, their legs are built like those of the ancient carnivorans, which are just as adapted for speed as the hooves of the Ungulates. The males of all of the various species have keratin horns with a bony core, much like those of the Pronghorns of old.
Stats;
Length: Varying
Diet: Omnivorous
Habitat: Varying, wooded areas
Location: Unknown
Notable Features: Sizes, horns
Temporal Range: Unknown


Giant Crowhawk: Massive flying descendants of Crows, these massive predatory birds reach sizes around that of the extinct Andean Condor, with wings stretching out to over fourteen feet. These massive birds of prey resemble giant, black, Hawks or Falcons with pitch black beaks, skin, feathers, gleaming black talons, and piercing amber eyes. In males, the two outer most tail feathers are elongated to three feet long and a bright silver, while females lack these extra-long tail feathers. However, only strong, healthy males grow these feathers. During mating season, male Giant Crowhawks will perform deadly aerial battles to gain the favor of females. When mated, Giant Crowhawks pair for life, and begin to build nests, often high atop cliffs. Giant Crowhawk eggs have a gestation period of seven to eight months, during this time, the female is unable to fly, causing the male to have to hunt and catch food for her. Hatching takes five to ten weeks after the eggs are laid. Out of all species of known Crowhawks, the Giant Crowhawk has the longest life-span of any of them, living for over thirty years, mating and laying eggs every two years. This is the reason for their populations to be so high, with food so difficult to find in the temperate latitudes.
Stats;
Length: Up to eight feet in length, fourteen foot wingspan
Diet: Anything they can pick up in their claws.
Habitat: Temperate Latitudes
Location: All temperate zones along latitudinal lines.
Notable Features: Size, and Ferocity rivaling even the ancient terror birds.
Temporal Range: Unknown


Butter Trap: Butter Traps are mostly insectivorous descendants of Butter Cups that live in the temperate latitudes, they feed by secreting a sweet, buttery smelling fluid out of their stamen onto their petals, enticing insects to land and feed on the sweet juices. But when an insect or other small animal lands on the plant's three inch, golden petals, the flower snaps shut, and locks its petals together before secreting digestive enzymes, and absorbing it's prey. Be careful not to inhale too strongly when smelling this flower, or you might lose part of your nose, as the flower's defense mechanism is to spray it's digestive enzymes out of the stamen at the attacker.
Stats;
Length: Plant
Diet: Insectivorous
Habitat: Temperate Zones
Location: Temperate Latitudes
Notable Features: Petals
Temporal Range: Unknown


Strangler Rose: The Strangler Rose is a species of plant that acts like the Strangler Figs of old, except the vines are covered in thorns and large Roses of a ten inch diameter. Strangler Roses exhibit numerous colors from the usual red, to a yellowed white. The Strangler Rose gets its sustenance from leaching sugars and water from the host plant, and feeding on insects it traps in its lush flowers.
Stats;
Length: Vines can grow to individual lengths of 18 feet, with thorns of up to four inches, and the flowers are ten inches in diameter
Diet: Insectivorous/Parasitic
Habitat: Tropical and Temperate areas
Location: Australia
Notable Features: Thorns and brightly colored flowers
Temporal Range: Unknown


Psittanullvolatus imperator
Emperor Macaw: The Emperor Macaw is a large herbivorous terrestrial avian from New Pangaea’s more tropical regions. It resembles an emu with a duck-like head and a curved duck-like bill. It is a light brown color with iridescent green feathers going from its eyes to halfway down its neck. Strangely, its eyes have the movement capabilities of chameleons.
Stats;
Length: Five feet long, Four feet high
Diet: Cycads and ferns
Habitat: Tropical rainforest
Location: Australia
Notable Features: Iridescent green feathers, eyes, it’s a giant terrestrial macaw for Pete’s sake!
Temporal Range: Unknown


Rascals: Arboreal descendants of the Shrews, the Rascals are widespread across New Pangaea in the areas that have thick tree-cover, and there are several different families, ranging from animals no larger than the extinct Wallaby to Liger-sized giants. Oddly, their legs are built much like the ancient Kinkajous', which are just as adapted for speed in the trees as the brachiating limbs of some tree-dwelling rodents and the surviving primates. They appear to be much like large tree-dwelling rats, with prehensile tails and an opposable fourth digit.
Stats;
Length: Varying
Diet: Omnivorous
Habitat: Area with a thick canopy
Location: Unknown
Notable Features: Prehensile tail and opposable digits
Temporal Range: Unknown


Duospondylotes: The Duospondylotes are a group of geckoes that have gained the adaptation of bipedal locomotion. Many are predatory, but still, there are some that have adapted to eat fruit, or are grazers. Some even move like the kangaroos of old.
Stats;
Length: Varying
Diet: Varying
Habitat: Varying
Location: Varying
Notable Features: Bipedal stance, and saurian appearance
Temporal Range: Unknown


Danglesack: The Danglesacks are a kind of fungus that grows in high places with low moisture and low heat. They get their name from their strange appearance, which, looks like a large tendril hanging from whatever tree, leaf, or other overhang, that ends in a large sack that appears very gelatinous. However, this ‘sack’ is actually the pod that contains the spores of the fungus, which are fairly large; the size of corn kernels, and within each pod, there are only two spores. However, to protect their spores, the Danglesacks have developed a noxious fluid that fills the rest of the empty space within the pod. Brian finds them all too amusing.
Stats;
Length: Varying; Pygmy Danglesacks, which grow on plant leaves, are from three to four inches; Mountain Danglesacks, which are often covered in fleshy folds and wrinkles to store more of the fluid, can grow to three feet; Tree Danglesacks have been known to grow up to nine feet in length.
Diet: Decaying matter/Chemovorous
Habitat: Anywhere the spores can reach that meet the requirements for growth.
Location: Varying
Notable Features: N/A
Temporal Range: Unknown


Drakes: The Drakes are a group of reptiles that developed from the Marine Iguana. Many are predatory, but still, there are some that have adapted to eat fruit, or are grazers. Though many are still amphibious, others have developed gliding membranes.
Stats;
Length: Varying from four feet to three meters.
Diet: Varying from species to species.
Habitat: Varying from species to species.
Location: Varying from species to species.
Notable Features: Large size, gliding membrane, horns, sails, capability to produce spark from chemical reaction in throat, second pair of ‘lungs’ that are filled with hydrogen and other flammable gasses produced by the bacteria in its stomach.
Temporal Range: Unknown


Heliosaur Milesoni: Heliosaurs are reptilian fish eaters that developed from basilisk lizards; their scaly skin has a beautiful tribal-looking striped pattern. They cannot climb trees, due to their great size when fully grown. However, hatchlings can climb trees fairly well with their sharp, hooked claws. Males possess a strange fleshy crest on their heads, a crest, which is attached to a bony rod that can be raised and lowered, which is used to open and close the crest. It is thought to be a mating display. Other than that, the physically look like a cross between a Suchomimus and an Iguanodon.
Stats;
Length: Varying from three to five meters.
Diet: Piscivorous
Habitat: Coastal, rivers, lakes, anywhere where water and fish can be found.
Location: Southern India
Notable Features: bipedal stance, massive herds of thirty individuals, nasal crest, beautiful striped pattern, incredible sense of smell.
Temporal Range: Unknown


Ghouls: Ghouls are reptilian predators that developed from chameleons; their camouflage has greatly developed to the point where if they stand still for long enough, they are nearly invisible, and can keep this near invisibility even in a full out run. Many are arboreal, but some have taken to dwelling on the ground, away from the numerous predators in the trees.
Stats;
Length: Varying from five to seven feet.
Diet: Predatory.
Habitat: Varying from Jungles, to the pine rainforests further inland.
Location: Varying from species to species.
Notable Features: Bipedal stance, camouflage, strange bony crests and cranial structures, highly dexterous tail, thermal vision.
Temporal Range: Unknown
Edited by Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan, May 9 2013, 07:15 PM.
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Bexi
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not a Transhuman
 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *
one big biological chaotic mass
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Deleted User
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Vast herds of antelope-like quadrapedal birds cross the great plains and are hunted down by theropodoid mammals whilst squids fly through the sky and fish live up trees.
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
-_- I wasn't exactly asking for someone to restate The Future is Wild. I little more detail on your Ideas would be nice.

And a bit of info: Humans died off from a virus that only seemed to effect more evolved apes, but seems to have left apes like Orangutans untouched.
Edited by Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan, Oct 27 2011, 05:04 PM.
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
I've changed a few things. Refer back to the beginning post to see what I've altered.
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Dragon
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Look away, buddy, look away.
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I think we should establish the main groups of animals. I doubt there would be many carnivorans left because of how specialized they tend to be, and same with the ungulates. much of that land would be deserts, so Reptiles would be dominant in some areas, while mammals would dominate in the areas closer to the coasts and poles. For arboreal mammals, there could be a mix of primates and the descendants of bats that left the air. Rodents would probably diversify into a variety of forms, effectively filling the niche left behind by the once dominant ungulates and carnivorans. But which groups of rodents would become predatorial, and which ones would become herbivorous?
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
Well, for one, I think that the new predators are probably linked to animals like Opossums, Raccoons, Rats, or maybe an omnivorous or carnivorous deviant of shrews.

Note: This discussion has sparked the inspiration for me to start writing a novel based on the discussion we have here, but placed in the setting of a survey crew from 3154 studying this new world. If you'd like to request something for the novel, a character/event/name/other, PM the details. I've already got a good chunk of the story.
Edited by Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan, Oct 31 2011, 06:06 PM.
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Russwallac
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"Ta-da!"
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By "more evolved" apes I assume you mean chimps, gorillas, and humans? They're not "more evolved" than orangs, they're just part of a different branch of the Great Ape evolutionary tree. You can't be "more" or "less" evolved than another comtemporary species. That's not how evolution works.
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
Meh, whatever. I actually can't remember what exactly I meant.

But I actually had in mind that it was just humans and chimps, Gorillas and Orangs lived through it.
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Russwallac
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"Ta-da!"
 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *
If it affects both humans and chimps, gorillas will almost certainly die out as well. And if it affects them, it'll probably effect orangs as well. You might as well make it human-specific.
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

I can also see passerines and shrews diversifying. Huge descendents of the crows could become the largest flying animals since the pterosaurs in the desert regions. Hyraxes and iguanas also go through an explosive radiation to cover herbivorous niches. Geckos replace foxes, chameleons and big cats as the dominant arboreal predators
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
I like your Ideas, Banana.

But sometimes your Ideas scare me.
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
Oct 31 2011, 05:08 PM
I like your Ideas, Banana.

But sometimes your Ideas scare me.
Thanks! In what way?
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Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
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I felt that one! XD
 *  *  *  *  *
BananaBoyL337
Oct 31 2011, 12:58 PM
I can also see passerines and shrews diversifying. Huge descendents of the crows could become the largest flying animals since the pterosaurs in the desert regions. Hyraxes and iguanas also go through an explosive radiation to cover herbivorous niches. Geckos replace foxes, chameleons and big cats as the dominant arboreal predators
*Envisioning giant killer Jackson’s chameleons*

O.O
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

Aiosian_Lord_Kaihoan
Oct 31 2011, 08:56 PM
BananaBoyL337
Oct 31 2011, 12:58 PM
I can also see passerines and shrews diversifying. Huge descendents of the crows could become the largest flying animals since the pterosaurs in the desert regions. Hyraxes and iguanas also go through an explosive radiation to cover herbivorous niches. Geckos replace foxes, chameleons and big cats as the dominant arboreal predators
*Envisioning giant killer Jackson’s chameleons*

O.O
I am practically drooling at the thought :D
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