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Shoveljaw; One of the last of the whales!
Topic Started: Jul 31 2011, 10:45 AM (817 Views)
Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

The Holocene extinctions affected whales tremendously, causing the complete extinction of baleen whales and the decline of many other species. The few that do survive have taken very specialized niches. Case and point is the shoveljaw, descended from modern day bottlenose dolphins. Like the Shoveltoothed elephants before them, they have developed a spoon like lower jaw. It uses this weird adaptation to scoop up shellfish hiding in the sea bed. It has a very powerful bite, and can crush the shell of a mollusk with very little difficulty. Like its ancestor its a very social and intelligent animal, using clicks and whistles to communicate with others of its kind.
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SIngemeister
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Hive Tyrant of the Essee Swarm

Personally, I think this is a fairly plausible creature. Maybe you could add a poll?
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

SIngemeister
Aug 5 2011, 01:32 PM
Personally, I think this is a fairly plausible creature. Maybe you could add a poll?
done
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FallingWhale
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Adult
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How big is it?
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Cephylus
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Berseerrrrrkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
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But remember, all cetaceans were supposed to have gone extinct in this project.
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SIngemeister
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Hive Tyrant of the Essee Swarm

We're a little lax on total extinction of Cetaceans, and it seems mainly to refer to the oceanic cetaceans, which are definitely entirely extinct. We can possibly be a little flexible on freshwater species, as there are, as far as I can see, no replacements for their niches as yet.

Also, I believe this would be better as a porpoise, which already eat crustaceans.
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El Squibbonator
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I'm a Sneaky Little Bee--Buzz Buzz
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But freshwater ceteceans (read: river dolphins) are critically endangered and therefore even less likely to make it.
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Bexi
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not a Transhuman
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true,and there is a "little bit" lack of information for this animal
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SIngemeister
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Hive Tyrant of the Essee Swarm

El Squibbonator
Aug 6 2011, 06:30 AM
But freshwater ceteceans (read: river dolphins) are critically endangered and therefore even less likely to make it.
There is the Finless Porpoise, a freshwater/estuary Japanese cetacean that is merely vulnerable.

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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

Cephylus
Aug 6 2011, 12:20 AM
But remember, all cetaceans were supposed to have gone extinct in this project.
The bottlenose dolphin is a generalist, intelligent and has a worldwide distribution. It will get through the Holocene just fine.

Also the Shoveljaw is around the same size as my ancestor, maybe a few inches smaller.
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Russwallac
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"Ta-da!"
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Sadly, in all likelihood, cetaceans will go extinct very soon (possibly within our own lifetimes). The creature itself is plausible, but its chances of surviving the Holocene extinction are practically nil.
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

Russwallac
Aug 7 2011, 01:59 PM
Sadly, in all likelihood, cetaceans will go extinct very soon (possibly within our own lifetimes). The creature itself is plausible, but its chances of surviving the Holocene extinction are practically nil.
But this species of dolphin is not endangered and I don't think its vulnerable either. If bears make it through dolphins will make it through. Trust me
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Canis Lupis
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Not all dictators were horrible. Unfortunately for spambots, I am.

Delphinids (dolphins and killer whales) are the most likely cetaceans to make it past the Holocene extinction. Will other cetaceans be extinct? I have no doubt about that. But the marine delphinids are so generalistic, so intelligent, so versatile that I think they'll make it through.

Will they diversify to reclaim the cetacean's former glory? Who knows? Personally, I think seals will begin to move in to take former cetacean niches. But delphinids will definitely survive in some form or another. So yes, I see this concept as plausible.
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Zorcuspine
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You never cease to suprise me blue hedgehog

Canis Lupis
Aug 7 2011, 05:23 PM
Delphinids (dolphins and killer whales) are the most likely cetaceans to make it past the Holocene extinction. Will other cetaceans be extinct? I have no doubt about that. But the marine delphinids are so generalistic, so intelligent, so versatile that I think they'll make it through.

Will they diversify to reclaim the cetacean's former glory? Who knows? Personally, I think seals will begin to move in to take former cetacean niches. But delphinids will definitely survive in some form or another. So yes, I see this concept as plausible.
So is it excepted?
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FallingWhale
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Adult
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Size?
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