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Sour gas Planet
Topic Started: Apr 7 2011, 12:56 AM (2,937 Views)
colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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I was having this inkling about making another project, I'm sure you alllllll are soooo aware of my previous ones. :r

This one has popped up out of interest in blue plants, normally I'm one to jump on the blue plant hatin' band wagon but then I stumbled upon phycocyanin as an accessory pigment and thought about the possibility of using it heavily along with chlorophyll a and maybe a few other pigments. But overwhelmingly phycocyanin.

The organisms' world would orbit a class K... maaaaaybe a class M star, though I find that iffy. So plenty of red light.

This world would also have a bit of an underdog land photoautotroph too, one that uses bacteriochlorophyll and uses Hydrogen Sulfide rather than water as the reducing agent. Which means there's going to be a decent amount of the stuff on the planet, I'm thinking higher levels of volcanic activity along with possibly bacteria performing conversions much like nitrogen fixers on Earth... symbionts...

Also since it's always a nice touch I'm thinking the atmosphere should be thicker or denser, thicker atmosphere means that even though the percentages could be low there'd still be much more of a compound or element (right?) along with allowing for happy flying floating things...

The bacteriochlorophyll organisms [BCO?] would be smaller than the phycocyanin organisms [PCO?] because of how they don't use water... as the underdog they'd fill the occasional smaller flora niche... I was thinking maybe they'd dominate the skies using updrafts and wind, but since Hydrogen Sulfide is a heavy gas I'm not sure if that's very likely...

I'd like to have some early branch off the PCO which consists of a bunch of photosynthetic membrane webbing inside a balloon filled with methane, all attached to the ground via strands of silk which the PCO produces. The balloon would also prevent water loss since the water would just be cycled inside, perhaps the membrane that forms the balloon wall could also have one-way CO2 channels... though the CO2 may cause the balloon to eventually become heavy, a CAM plant form of storing CO2 might be preferred... To get back down to the ground they would simply reel in the silk and digest it. Oh, also I'm thinking the PCO would not have cell walls...

Another thing, heavily influenced by Fentil (Purple-Plasmid, he's a part of this site, look him up on Deviantart), are positive and negative pressure pumps which both essentially consist of a cartilaginous chamber with a bladder inside and water pressure controlled by aquaporins.

Having hypersimplistic leaves would be fun, a leaf consisting of a single layer of cells that secrete a tough yet flexible covering that seals them from the outside world, the cells would be loosely packed so that fluids can flow over them and chemical exchange can take place, having both ends attach to the vascular system so that there can be a constant flow in one direction through a single passage would work out nicely I think...
Edited by colddigger, Apr 14 2011, 05:21 PM.
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Parasky
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Stark Raving Mad

I like it. Go for it.
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Fakey
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FALCON CONFIRMED
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This sounds wonderful Cold. Only one probplem. Where are the SKYWHALES DAMNIT!?
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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Well, I had already made a project based around the idea of a sky ecosystem without skywhales (I should jump-start that project again), so this one'll possibly have some, right now I'm just enjoying myself with the photoautotrophs, I haven't even thought up any heterotrophic mobile organisms yet...
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T.Neo
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Translunar injection: TLI
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It all sounds all very interesting and well thought out, but... one question I have, is will hydrogen sulfide be available and abundant enough in the atmosphere to support its biological role described here?
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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That's an issue that I've been rolling around in my head, I'm actually thinking that the "present" time which the project would be taking place in could be a period in the planet's history where atmospheric Hydrogen Sulfide has peaked (or is declining), also possibly the BCO cause favorable conditions for microbes that produce the compound.
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Parasky
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Stark Raving Mad

I like it, but no skywhales man. They're unrealistic and generic. Go for floating plants, those are always cool.
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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but every project needs a joke organism!

---

But honestly, if I were to put a skywhale in this I'd probably do some kind of communal super-organism...
Edited by colddigger, Apr 7 2011, 04:02 PM.
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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Hm... I'm thinking the Phycos should be descended from a motile cell that have a single flagellum made from flagellin constructed similarly to Archaea (from the base) and powered by a Hydrogen ion pump, I suppose this would result in it spinning.

You guys think that would work? I'm not sure if that would automatically cause the flagellum to pull the cell along rather than push, if that's the case I wonder if it would be more difficult for the cells to become colonial since movement of cells opposite of one another would result in breaking apart the colony. Also since they do not have cell walls... I'm not sure what kind of effect it would have...

I'm not entirely sure why I want them to have flagella... I suppose to give me something different to work with, motile gametes (though Earth Plants already had those previous to their hyperspecialization) being one thing... though the rotational movement may prevent me from developing cilia that can be used to move mucus across an epithelial membrane. Perhaps I could have a pair of short flagella that rotate clock-wise and counter-clock-wise next to each other and move mucus between them like a channel... that might not work since it would be a whole sheet or tube of these things trying to move stuff in one direction.

Maybe a cilium which involves a short rigid filament of flagellin which is separated from the rotor and is flicked as an attachment to the rotor contacts an attachment at the base of the cilium... Not sure how that'd work though...

I haven't put much thought into the bacterios... but I'm considering that their cells would have cell walls... not sure what of though...

The motile critters, what would essentially be animals... I have put almost no thought into whatsoever. BUT. I'm thinking that their cells would be very close to ours, with the exception that the ancestors had only cilia (and lots of them, but still basically what our cilia are rather than made of flagellin like the Phycos). As far as I know the ancestor of animals was a hollow ball of colonial Choanoflagellates, though this makes sense for a cell with a flagellum it wouldn't for one covered in cilia. So I'm think that the ancestors of this planet's Critters would be more along the lines of a string or tube...

-----

So! Do you guys think it best for me to use edits like I did with LOs? Or should I just do new posts whenever I think up some new stuff?

Edited by colddigger, Apr 14 2011, 10:21 PM.
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Parasky
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Stark Raving Mad

Keep it. Moving in unison would be easy to fix with some kind of enzyme transfer or something. Get the cells communicating, so to speak. Moving opposite each other could be useful for when they begin to form animals, maybe for a protozoa that uses them to form a current to drag in food or move?
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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I was thinking they'd use it for movement, it's the "Blue Plants" that have the flagellum-d ancestor... I'm actually thinking that having tubes lined with cells that use these flagella to draw up liquids could work for a small line of them... My biggest issue with having them used to move things around is that they would rotate 360 like a Bacteria flagellum rather than whip like a Eukaryote flagellum... I suppose I could have them tilted so that they pull a certain direction, that might work out very nicely. Another idea would be that the tubes are filled with grills lined with these cells for dragging liquid across them... That could work out very nicely since I could have cells on the grills aimed both directions, I maybe even be able to have a form of circulatory system development between plant groups based on how complex the tubing is.
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Parasky
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Stark Raving Mad

It might work for simple plants, but using individual cells to pull around liquids and such won't work with larger organisms. You'll need something more substantial to move more water.
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Holben
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Will of the People

Something like xyelm works for trees, basically what you're saying about lines of cells?
But is there a satisfactory amount of transpiration to draw it up?
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colddigger
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Joke's over! Love, Parasky
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I was thinking more along the lines of having the entire inside wall of the tube lined with these cells working together to draw the fluids across them from point A to point B. Much like the cilia in our respiratory system moving mucus across them or kind of (vaguely) like the choanocytes in sponges causing a current through the animal...

I was thinking that thesetubes would be more along the lines of what the phloem is to Earth Plants or some way to move materials around certain parts of the plant, to draw water up from the ground they would have to use the pressure system that I described in the first post.

Errr... when I said
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...a small line of them...
I meant a small lineage of Phycos... which like Parasky said would have to be very small in body size for it to work... IS that what you meant Holben?
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Holben
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Will of the People

Gah.
The cells which are pushing are going to make water in respiration too.

Pressure's all good.
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