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In theaters now or coming soon
Topic Started: Jan 6 2011, 07:23 AM (6,193 Views)
tgir
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Good! ALWAYS leave your phone off when you go to the movies.
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tgir
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Just came back from Prometheus, which I liked, although I think it was something of a mistake to see it with my husband because I didn't lose myself in the movie so much.

I don't want to spoil anything but there were two parts that really irked me (aside from anything science related, lapses and gaps in logic, story, etc):

1. He's the scientist and she's the girlfriend? GMAFB. I would hope in 80 years we shall have progressed more than that.
2. Stephen Fucking Stills. GMAnother FB. 80 years from now, somebody will still remember Fucking Stephen Stills? And a bad ass black dude will reference Stephen Fucking Stills? No. Way. Jose.
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tgir
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EXACTLY!

Or rather, he was supposedly a scientist, but in reality, I saw him engage in ZERO behavior that made him seem anything like a scientist, even by movie standards.

Spoilerish if you haven't seen the film:










Also, Vickers' being the daughter of Weyland, and a less worthy heir than if she had been his son.

Other than that, I liked the film. And a nice set up for Prometheus II.
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tgir
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I agree that Cohen was creepy but I loved Hugo. Maybe you needed to be at a theater. Seriously, I came out feeling happy and satisfied and that almost never happens at the moves.

Our town theater is closed for renovations, so no chance to see anything new.
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tgir
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Just came back from Wreck It Ralph, which was pretty good. I know that I am not the key demographic it's aimed at, but still appreciated the premise, the voice actors and the over all animation. Audience had a lot of kids with parents and it was appropriate for that age, and also enjoyed by adults and I would guess teens/young adults. And I say this as someone who never plays any video games (but remembers playing pinball sometimes--and remembers when Indiana decreed that pinball games were 'gambling' because you could win games--since overturned.)
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tgir
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It's on my list but I may have missed it in my town. Good films tend not to last so long. We saw a couple last weekend with Lincoln as being the next one on deck. It may not have lasted though.... will have to check.
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Just saw Life of Pi (2 D version but there is a 3 d version that perhaps I might try to see as well). Visually one of the most stunning films I've ever seen. I was a bit surprised when I learned the book was going to be made into a film but was very happy to learn that Ang Lee was doing it. I was not disappointed. If you've been to a movie theater recently, you will know to expect the most stunning shots. The film does not disappoint in any way. Every frame is art.

It has been some years since I read the book (shortly after it came out--in 2002, I think) but if memory serves, it is fairly faithful if somewhat simpler and a love interest is added in the film, although the spares the audience some of the most graphic scenes. Be warned: some graphic scenes which will be very upsetting to animal lovers. The book's ending was more ambiguous than the film. Purists might quibble but I don't think the simplification of some things, deletion of one chapter, and some other changes which serve to flesh out the character of Pi detract from the film.

Spoiler: click to toggle


That said, it is a beautifully done film and one that for me, in the end, left me feeling uplifted.
Edited by tgir, Dec 9 2012, 11:45 AM.
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tgir
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I just saw Lincoln. Very good film, concentration on the efforts to pass the 13th Amendment and the end of the Civil War. I realize this is practically apostasy, but I'm not a big fan of Daniel Day Lewis. That said, it was a very good film, with an interesting take on Lincoln as a man, and giving a very different view of the times and what the political forces were like and the machinations behind the passage of the amendment.

I believe that KMInfinity also saw it and highly recommended it.
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tgir
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Fence sitting re: Les Miz. I think it's really just that I'm not up for a sad movie now, or one with a lot of sadness in it.

We did see The Hobbit (2 D). Please don't get me wrong: I think it's being well done, etc. BUT: For years before they started filming LOTR, I was really hoping for a wonderful live action version of The Hobbit (there's a halfway decent animated version--very simple animation but good story telling. My kids adored it) that would be suitable for children--not the pre-school set, but school aged and above. Because that's what The Hobbit was to me: a story suitable for children and also adults, a wonderful adventure, full of magic of the best kinds, but not ignoring the dark side of the world, either.

This is not that film. It is bloated, overly long (they added what didn't need to be there and dropped some things that I think they should not have) and so very obviously directed towards adolescents and above. Yes, there were some kids in the audience but none under about age 10 that I saw and we went to a matinee (cheap in our old age. and sleepy). Mostly, young adults.

They've already taken every heroic comic book there was and turned them into adult escapism or rather 'adult' escapism and further turned them into films that are not suitable for children. Children are left with films that are stupid, saccharine, and with no joy or wonder or magic (real or imaginary) or wit nor intelligence. How terrible that adults are co-opting childhood for adults with deep pockets who instead are clinging to childhood themselves or at least avoiding adulthood.

I write this as someone who enjoys TLOTR, the Hobbit, and some, if not all, of the super hero comic book films.

But really, can't we let the kids have something worthwhile?
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tgir
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Dax
Dec 31 2012, 12:11 AM
Yeah, if you're not coming out of the theatre anxiously chanting 'Six more hours! Six more hours!', then maybe Jackson could/should have trimmed it a bit...

>> Children are left with films that are stupid, saccharine, and with no joy or wonder or magic (real or imaginary) or wit nor intelligence.

I've heard mostly positive things about Disney's Wreck-It Ralph, and think Pixar is twelve-for-thirteen for magical, joyful films for the whole family ('Cars 2' is the exception).

I understand your call for more quality kids' entertainment, but I'm not surprised by The Hobbit or the comic book movies for casting as wide a net as possible in attracting audiences... it's all about money...
I saw and liked (pretty well) Wreck It Ralph, which was suitable for kids, even if it did cater to a specific stereotype of what girls like (pink candy)--however within the context of a video game so probably not worse than catering to a stereotype of boys (and men) wanting to shoot stuff up. I've just never been into pink or candy (unless it is chocolate). Yes, Pixar is great but it shouldn't be the only decent choice for kids or family friendly film.

But there ought to be actual live action films of good quality for children/families. I know there's a pretty significant market out there because I work with mostly parents of young children who have long discussions about how they'd love to find more decent movies for their kids or something they could take their parents and their school aged kids to go see. I am not holding this films up as any standard of high cinematic achivement, but back in my childhood. we went to the drive in a few times every summer. We brought a bag full of popped popcorn and our pillows. The schedule was this: find a nice spot to park, and let the kids burn off some energy on the play ground at the theater (with parental supervision). Assuming no trips to the doctor to take care of injuries there sustained (that would be me when I fell from the monkey bars and opened a nice gash in my forehead), as darkness fell, you made your trip to the bathroom, and then the car. First up was a nice long good cartoon short--Tweety Bird or Road Runner or Pepee LePew--followed by a family friendly feature length film--usually from Disney. Maybe animated but often not. I remember very well seeing Old Yeller, In Search of the Castaways, Swiss Family Robinson. This would be followed by an 'adult' feature by which I mean something like How The West was Won or Guns of Navaronne or The Man Who Knew Too Much, or some western. We saw Ben Hur which was absolutely fabulous on such a gigantic screen. Little to no swearing, no explicit sex. Mostly we kids were asleep by then, but if we weren't, we weren't traumatized, except for the post chariot scene and parts of any war film. Disney released something decent every year, and re-released something from its vaults.

What I think about the Hobbit is that it didn't cast as wide a net as possible: it cast a net to specifically catch those audiences who wouldn't see it just one time but many times, and again with every newly re-mastered version, etc. If they made it too kid friendly, they risked having the geeks and nerds skip it or be overly critical (they've missed re: critical). It is indeed all about money, which is sad. And probably loses them some money in the end.

If Peter Jackson had really made The Hobbit first, before his budget and his ego got so bloated, we probably would have gotten the film I really wanted.

Went for a drive yesterday and was listening to NPR and multiple really nice piece about television (thought of all of you) and about how people watch and share and discuss (again, thought of you all but even more and the chat and watch over on...now I've forgotten what that site was called--Telenext with SuperSage) and about how television has become higher quality entertainment than film and how that renaissance came about. I'm hoping for such a renaissance for film. I think it will have to come. People my kids' ages are having kids and they aren't going to be satisfied with stupid iterations of stupid Barbie films.

here's a link to a long list. I can see that it is a replay from previously aired pieces but worth reading/listening to if yo can:

http://www.npr.org/search/index.php?searchinput=cable+tv
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tgir
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Huh. I really liked Lawrence (but agree re: the actual film. Underwhelming. I had high hopes when I read they were changing directors for the second film (which is where I feel the film truly went wrong) but no: they're keeping him. Missed Opportunity. Majorly.) Of course, I am a pretty big fan of Lawrence any way. If you haven't already, see Winter's Bone (not as great as the book, which I think you should read). Warning: not an upper. But very, very good. Film pulls back a bit from some of the darkest parts of the book, per usual. Stunning performances. And I love the music.

Our small town theater recently remodeled to include all stadium seating. No giant screens but decent enough. Aside from the quality of the films themselves, my biggest gripes include people who take out their illuminated devices and one mother who allowed her daughter to wear sneakers with flashing lights (I think that was Brave but could have been Wreck It Ralph). During The Hobbit, the person behind me kept kicking the back of my seat, but mostly stopped when I asked him to. After a bit, it began again (annoying) but he had obviously made an effort. After the lights went on, I saw he was about 10 years old and realized he was simply as still as he could be and was just being 10 instead of a jerk.
Edited by tgir, Jan 1 2013, 12:21 PM.
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tgir
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I am certainly no expert on film making but there were a number of places where I felt the scenes played flat, rather than dramatic and meaningful. I know there were constraints re: Rue's death, about depicting the killing of a child and I respect that they wanted to make a film that could be seen by the books' target audience and also potentially be shown as companion pieces to the books in a school setting. Even taking all of that into consideration, huge let down in terms of emotional impact.

Dax, am glad to hear that they are changing directors. That was what I heard initially, then read that the original director WAS coming back and my heart sank. So, hopefully, the direction of the next installments will restore the emotion.

KMI: Here's where I felt Lawrence was brilliant: when they are moving into the arena, in the tubes, the terror she was conveying, without being over the top. Not many actresses could do it. Now the challenge will be for her to remain as fresh and young (and available) as she was for the first film.
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tgir
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Saw Silver Linings Playbook and really liked it.
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I'm not usually a big Bradley Cooper fan (not an anti-fan, either, but he's not a big draw for me), but really did enjoy him here. Love Jennifer Lawrence (but like her better with light hair). Of course I love DeNiro, thought that it was genius to cast Julia Stiles and Jennifer Lawrence as sisters; loved Chris Tucker who is usually too manic for me but here, perfect. Loved Shea Whigham as DeNiro's son (looked like he could be), loved Jacki Weaver, loved the psychiatrist (actor and character) and the police officer (actor/character/concept. I wish there were such officers and hope that there are and if there are, please, God, make more of them. Many, many more.)

I think that the whole thing was great (if not a completely realistic view of mental illnesses, the legal and mental health system, and well, life) and am happy that they addressed bipolar disorder and mental illness in general and the havoc that can be caused and the efforts required to overcome.

As a side note, I see on the internet that Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence are paired again in a film scheduled to be released 2013 entitled Serena.

Also, Bradley Cooper is signed up for another project (un-named) with David O. Russel. I'm on board for that but have no interest in Hangover III.
Edited by tgir, Jan 27 2013, 10:55 AM.
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tgir
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Just saw 42, which was really good. I am not much of an historian nor much of a baseball afficianado, but I found the film to be very engaging, well shot, good acting all around. Best I've seen/ film I've seen Harrison Ford in for ......a long time. Chadwick Boseman was really good, and so was Nicole Beharie. Note to fashion gods: Please observe the wardrobe for Nicole Beharie and see if you can't incorporate some of this into your next collections. I loved just looking at her.

Hubby is more knowledgeable about history and really knows baseball history--he found it to be pretty accurate. Good job of showing that racism was not confined to the south, and giving a small taste of what it must have been like to be in the shoes of the Robinsons during that time.
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tgir
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Glad to know you liked Ironman3. Was hoping to hear from someone whose opinion I trust.

I know I won't be seeing Furious 6 or Hangover3. Up in the air re: Gatsby. I was excited and then I saw the trailer and now: not really. May, sometime, just to say I did but not excited now.
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tgir
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I haven't. Did you like it? I'm still fence sitting about seeing it. Been really hectic lately...

Rented Flight with Denzel Washington. Really good film. I'll bet John Goodman had a blast in his role. Washington was superb, of course.
Edited by tgir, May 31 2013, 09:59 PM.
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tgir
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Dax, Everything Must Go is excellent, but a departure for his usual films. Not so much broad comedy. One of my very favorite films is Stranger than Fiction, a real gem. imo. I predict that you would love it very much. But again: not so much broad ha ha ha comedy.
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Still is very cute.

Comedy is much harder to do well than dramatic acting or so I've heard. But yes, it is great to see a performer known for comedy routines and broad comedic roles perform in dramatic pieces. I am not so much a huge fan of the very broad comedic comedies that are so popular today. Loved the old (even for me) Cary Grant/Myrna Loy or Cary Grant/Irene Dunn or Cary Grant/Katherine Hepburn or Cary Grant/Audrey Hepburn or Cary Grant..... you get the picture.
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tgir
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I am soooo jealous re: Much Ado About Nothing. I checked: the closest theater to me showing it is >100 miles away. I'll have to wait for the DVD, I am sure.

I hope I'll get to see the Sandra Bullock movie but I'm working a lot this week and it might not last until next weekend, seeing as it's two women instead of two men in a cop/buddy movie. May end up waiting for the dvd as well....
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tgir
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The World's End is on my list to see. Probably won't show locally but it's on my someday list.
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The World's End DID actually come to my town (I am beyond shocked) but unfortunately, I was too wiped out to see it--it left after one weekend.

However, I can hardly believe it but The Way Way Back played and I saw it tonight. This was one of the very, very best films I've seen in...ever. Great performances by the entire cast which included well known and newcomers. If you haven't seen it, you should definitely make a point to see it.
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tgir
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Saw Catching Fire and felt that it was much, much better than Hunger Games. Glad they switched directors and (I assume) upped the budget. Gave more of the impact that was lacking in the first while maintaining the ability to show to primary audience of young people. I suspect those unfamiliar with the books will be very upset with the ending, which simply set up the next installment.
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It is very doubtful 12 Years A Slave will ever play near me. But my son lives in a much larger city and he saw it and thought it was one of the best films he's ever seen. And he will never watch it again.
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I also saw Catching Fire but not at a midnight showing. Our local movie theater is a small multiplex and was showing it in two theaters, with showings staggered by 20 minutes. On about the 4th day of showing, the second in the 20 minute spaced shows, the theater was packed.

I thought the change in directors and additional money thrown at the film were well worth it. I can't help but be a bit disappointed in the casting of Liam Hemsworth and Josh Hutcherson who are fine, I am sure. It's just that Hutcherson looks like he could have been a wrestler on my high school wrestling team and Hemsworth is so obviously the star quarterback. Maybe if they were less meticulously coiffed and groomed.... I don't know. I can't criticize their acting, but they seem obviously designed to be teenaged heartthrobs. For every other character I believe the actors sort of disappear into their roles. Those two: I don't think they're allowed to step out of that box labeled: Which Hot Boy Will Catniss Choose??? In a way, the books were like that, but both characters were so much more. These actors in these roles are not. I don't know where the limitations are: script, actor, director, wardrobe/styling/makeup? No idea. It just seems a little Ken doll to me.
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tgir
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Depends on what you're in the mood for. Catching Fire is fine, if Chris would enjoy it. There's also the next installment of The Hobbit and American Hustle. If it were me and my hubby, he'd want to see The Hobbit or perhaps American Hustle. I didn't make him go to see Catching Fire.
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tgir
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Yeah, we saw The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. More like: The Hobbit: The Desecration of a Perfectly Wonderful Story That is Interesting, Engaging, and Suitable for Older Children Without Being Saccharine or Dumbed Down Thanks to Peter Jackson Who Should Never Be Allowed Near a Film Ever Again.

I am not big on orthodoxy re: books made into films. When I knew he was stretching The Hobbit into 3 parts, I knew he would be padding. I hoped that he would spend some time and effort on what made the book charming and engaging and a classic for so many years. I hoped for the songs. But nope: all of that got shot all to hell for the sake of orcs, orcs and more orcs. I don't even care that he invented characters, borrowed characters from other books and inserted a silly love triangle. I do care that he took everything that was enjoyable and fun and yes: that terribly over used word: magical about the whole thing and made it simply an homage to some video game directed at 14 year old boys who are too afraid to fantasize about girls so they fantasize about killing stuff.

The casting was good. This time around, I was irritated by the heavy make up on the dwarves. The acting was good, if you forget Rivendale. The song at the end while the credits rolled was really good but where were all the songs from the original?????? It's not like he didn't have the budget.

After the first installment, I was excited to see #2. Now, I am very doubtful I will bother with #3.

Frankly, the 1977 animated version was MUCH better and much more faithful to the book.

Edited by tgir, Dec 16 2013, 09:45 AM.
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I don't know that there is or will be a video game. I just think that all of the orc killing/chasing stuff would have been better suited to a video game. I found it tedious and out of place.

But: everyone else I know (outside of my immediate family) is giving it great reviews. And they are not (chronologically) 14 year old boys.
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tgir
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In the book, Tolkien wrote songs for the book, with lyrics. He didn't write music at the time but there are accounts that he wrote music for one and worked in collaboration on others, back in the 60's, which I didn't actually know until I googled it. I first read the book years ago, when I was 12 or so and then later over the years and with my kids. There were lyrics to lots of songs in The Hobbit, which is something my kids particularly enjoyed. I would have expected some or at least one. Mostly, I have been disappointed that the sense of adventure and joy of The Hobbit has been completely beaten out and replaced with orcs. It was really a book for children (albeit not little kids), with a great sense of wonder about it. That's all been removed, imo, from the second. The first still had enough that I was excited to see more and have been looking forward to it all year. FWIW, my husband didn't hate it as much as I did.

I have always wanted to see it made well into a live action film and thought it should have been the first of Tolkien's works. I still think that if Jackson had made it early, before he became so enthralled with the money and the fandom and the CGI and fame, it could have been what it should have been: A rousing adventure story for older kids and adults who still remembered the joys of reading a good adventure that swept you up in its story.

This second one is so over-wrought there is no need to imagine a darn thing. It's fairly beaten out of you with endless orc heads rolling about. Horrid, horrid thing, altogether. And a real shame. The casting is very good.

FWIW, I like the Smaug scenes, although they deviate quite a bit from the book (and again, to the story's detriment. Bilbo's exchange with Smaug was very key and shouldn't have been so altered.) But, the best part of the whole thing, imo. By far.
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Forgot to say that I saw Gone Girl--pretty good version of the book. I was concerned about Affleck in the role but he was fine. At the end, Rosamond Pike is heinous/crazy/scary.

Also saw The Equalizer which bore nearly no resemblance to the TV show. Lots of action and very very violent . Denzel was good but that's a given.
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